Etymology
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lifelike (adj.)
1610s, "likely to live," from life (n.) + like (adj.). Meaning "exactly like the living original" is from 1725.
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biodegradable (adj.)
also bio-degradable, "susceptible to decomposition by living organisms" (especially bacteria), 1962, from bio- + degrade + -able.
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Tagalog (n.)
people living near Manila in the Philippines, also their language, 1704, from Tagalog taga "native to" + ilog "river."
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couch (n.2)

in couch-grass, 1570s; a corruption of Old English cwice "living, alive" (see quick (adj.)).

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vivisection (n.)
"dissection of a living animal," 1690s, from Latin vivus "alive" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + ending from dissection. Related: Vivisectionist.
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biogeography (n.)
also bio-geography, "science of the distribution of living things in different regions," 1892, from bio- + geography. Related: Biogeographical.
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lapidocolous (adj.)
of beetles, "living under stones," 1888, from Latin lapis "a stone" (see lapideous) + colus "inhabiting," from colere "to inhabit" (see colony).
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biotaxy (n.)
"classification and arrangement of living organisms according to their characteristics," 1853, from bio- "life" + -taxy, from Greek taxis "arrangement" (see tactics).
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biodiversity (n.)
also bio-diversity, "the range of variety in the living organisms of a given area," by 1988, from bio- + diversity.
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biomorph (n.)

"a decorative form representing a living object," 1895 (A.C. Haddon), from bio- "life" + -morph "form," a word of uncertain etymology. Related: Biomorphic.

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