Etymology
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bioluminescence (n.)
also bio-luminescence, "emission of light by living organisms," 1909; see bio- + luminescence.
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modus vivendi (n.)

"mode of living," especially a working agreement between contending parties, 1844, Latin, literally "way of living or getting along" (see modus).

Modus vivendi is any temporary compromise that enables parties to carry on pending settlement of a dispute that would otherwise paralyse their activities. [Fowler]
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epizoic (adj.)
"living on the surface or in the skin of animals," 1832, from epizoon + -ic.
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in vivo 
1898, Latin; "within a living organism," from vivere "to live" (see vital).
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lifelike (adj.)
1610s, "likely to live," from life (n.) + like (adj.). Meaning "exactly like the living original" is from 1725.
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free-liver (n.)
"one who indulges the appetites," 1711, from free (adj.) + liver (n.2). Related: Free-living.
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biodegradable (adj.)
also bio-degradable, "susceptible to decomposition by living organisms" (especially bacteria), 1962, from bio- + degrade + -able.
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viva voce 
also viva-voce, "by word of mouth," 1580s, Latin, literally "living-voice," ablative of viva vox.
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Tagalog (n.)
people living near Manila in the Philippines, also their language, 1704, from Tagalog taga "native to" + ilog "river."
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couch (n.2)

in couch-grass, 1570s; a corruption of Old English cwice "living, alive" (see quick (adj.)).

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