Etymology
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*mer- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to rub away, harm." Possibly identical with the root *mer- that means "to die" and forms words referring to death and to beings subject to death.

It forms all or part of: amaranth; ambrosia; amortize; Amritsar; immortal; manticore; marasmus; mare (n.3) "night-goblin, incubus;" morbid; mordacious; mordant; moribund; morsel; mort (n.2) "note sounded on a horn at the death of the quarry;" mortal; mortality; mortar; mortgage; mortify; mortmain; mortuary; murder; murrain; nightmare; post-mortem; remorse.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit mrnati "crushes, bruises," mriyate "to kill," martave "to die," mrta- "died, dead," mrtih "death," martah "mortal man," amrta- "immortal;" Avestan miriia- "to die," miryeite "dies," Old Persian martiya- "man;" Hittite mer- "to disappear, vanish," marnu- "to make disappear;" Armenian meranim "to die;" Greek marainein "to consume, exhaust, put out, quench," marasmus "consumption," emorten "died," brotos "mortal" (hence ambrotos "immortal"); Latin mors (genitive mortis) "death," mori "to die;" Armenian merani- "to die;" Gothic maurþr, Old English morþ "murder;" Old Irish marb, Welsh marw "dead;" Lithuanian mirti "to die," mirtis "death;" Old Church Slavonic mreti "to die," mrutvu "dead;" Russian mertvyj, Serbo-Croatian mrtav "dead."

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expire (v.)

c. 1400, "to die," from Old French expirer "expire, elapse" (12c.), from Latin expirare/exspirare "breathe out, blow out, exhale; breathe one's last, die," hence, figuratively, "expire, come to an end, cease," from ex "out" (see ex-) + spirare "to breathe" (see spirit (n.)). "Die" is the older sense in English; that of "breathe out" is attested from 1580s. Of laws, patents, treaties, etc., mid-15c. In 17c. also transitive. Related: Expired; expiring.

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get along (v.)
"agree, live harmoniously," 1875, from get (v.) + along (adv.).
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shotten (adj.)

of a fish, "having shot its spawn," and accordingly of inferior value, early 15c., past-participle adjective from shoot (v.). Applied to persons, with sense of "exhausted by sickness," from 1590s. Also sometimes used of curdled milk.

Go thy ways, old Jack; die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a shotten herring. There live not three good men unhanged in England ; and one of them is fat, and grows old. God help the while! a bad world, I say. [Falstaff, in "1 Henry IV"] 
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outlive (v.)

"to live longer than," late 15c., from out- + live (v.). Related: Outlived; outliving. Old English had oferbiden (Middle English overbiden, literally "over-bide") for "to outlive, outlast, live through," also oferlibban (literally "over-live;" compare German überleben, Danish overleve). 

Outlive, Survive. Outlive is generally the stronger, carrying something of the idea of surpassing or beating another in vitality or hold upon life; it is tenderer to say that one survives than that he outlives his wife or friend. [Century Dictionary, 1895] 
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in vivo 
1898, Latin; "within a living organism," from vivere "to live" (see vital).
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viand (n.)

"article of food," early 14c., from Anglo-French viaunde, Old French viande "food (vegetable as well as animal), victuals, provisions" (11c.), a dissimilation of Vulgar Latin *vivanda, from Late Latin vivenda "things for living, things to be lived upon," in classical Latin, "be live," neuter plural gerundive of vivere "to live" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). The French word later was restricted to fresh meat.

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decease (v.)
Origin and meaning of decease

"to die, depart from life," early 15c., decesen, from decease (n.). Related: Deceased; deceasing.

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dying (n.)

late 13c., "death, act of expiring, loss of life," verbal noun from die (v.).

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vita (n.)
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."
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