Etymology
Advertisement
narrowly (adv.)

Old English nearolice "with little breadth or extent, closely; strictly; carefully;" see narrow (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "only by a little, by a small distance" is attested from 1550s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
petite (adj.)

"little, of small size," usually of a woman or girl, 1784 (from 1712 in French phrases taken into English), from French petite, fem. of petit "little" (see petit). As a size in women's clothing, attested from 1929.

Related entries & more 
pusillanimous (adj.)

early 15c., pusillanimus, "timid, lacking strength and firmness of mind," from Late Latin pusillanimis "having little courage" (used in Church Latin to translate Greek oligopsykhos "small-souled"), from Latin pusillis "very weak, little" (diminutive of pullus "young animal," from PIE root *pau- (1) "few, little") + animus "spirit, courage" (see animus). Related: Pusillanimously; pusillanimousness.

Related entries & more 
parvi- 

word-forming element used in science and meaning "small, little," from combining form of Latin parvus "small," which is from a metathesized form of PIE *pau-ro-, suffixed form of root *pau- (1) "few, little."

Related entries & more 
smokeless (adj.)
"emitting little smoke," 1580s, from smoke (n.1) + -less.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
marionette (n.)

"a puppet worked by strings," c. 1620, literally "little little Mary," from French marionette (16c.), diminutive of Old French mariole "figurine, idol, picture of the Virgin Mary," itself a diminutive of Marie (see Mary). For ending, see -ette.

Related entries & more 
pellet (v.)

"to form into little balls," 1590s, from pellet (n.).

Related entries & more 
xeric (adj.)

"having little moisture, very dry," 1926; see xero- + -ic.

Related entries & more 
floret (n.)
c. 1400, flourette, "a little flower, a bud," from Old French florete "little flower," also the name of a cheap silk material, diminutive of flor "flower, blossom" (from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom"). Botany sense "small flower in a cluster" is from 1670s.
Related entries & more 
Nevin 
surname and masc. proper name, from Irish/Gaelic Naomhin "little saint."
Related entries & more 

Page 3