Etymology
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hemline (n.)
also hem-line, 1899, from hem (n.) + line (n.).
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waistline (n.)
also waist-line, 1867, from waist + line (n.).
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bottom line (n.)

figurative sense is attested from 1832, from profit-and-loss accounting, where the final figure calculated is the bottom line on the page. Also (especially as an adjective) bottom-line, bottomline.

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shoreline (n.)
also shore-line, 1852 in the geographical sense, from shore (n.) + line (n.).
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coastline (n.)

"the outline of a shore or coast," 1819, from coast (n.) + line (n.).

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tagline (n.)
"punchline of a joke," 1926, originally "last line in an actor's speech" (1916), from tag (n.1) + line (n.).
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neckline (n.)

also neck-line, "shape of the top of a woman's garment at the front," 1900, from neck (n.) + line (n.).

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liner (n.2)
"person who fits a lining to," 1610s, agent noun from line (v.1). Meaning "thing serving as a lining" is from 1869. Liner notes in a record album are attested from 1953.
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waterline (n.)
also water-line, 1620s, line where the water rises to on the hull of a ship afloat, from water (n.1) + line (n.).
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strapline (n.)
1960, in typography, "subhead above the main head," from strap (n.) + line (n.). In reference to a woman's undergarments, by 1973.
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