Etymology
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obsessive (adj.)

"of or pertaining to obsession; liable to obsess," 1911, from obsess + -ive. As a noun, "person characterized by obsession," by 1966. Related: Obsessively. Obsessive-compulsive "combining (psychological) obsessions and compulsions" is attested from 1927.

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unaccountable (adj.)
1640s, "inexplicable," from un- (1) "not" + accountable (adj.) here meaning "of which an account can be given." Meaning "not liable to be called to account" is recorded from 1640s. Related: Unaccountably; unaccountability; unaccountableness.
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phobic (adj.)

"pertaining to or characterized by phobia," 1888, from phobia + -ic. As a noun, "a person who has a phobia," from 1968. The Greek adjective was phobetikos "liable to fear."

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indictable (adj.)
mid-15c., enditable, "capable of being indicted, liable to indictment," from indict + -able. From 1721 of actions, "that may be punished by indictment."
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answerable (adj.)
"liable to be held responsible," 1540s, from answer (v.) in the "be responsible for" sense + -able. Less-common meaning "able to be answered" is from 1690s.
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fencible (adj.)
early 15c., "capable of making a defense," short for defensible; also see fence (n.). As a noun, "soldier enlisted to defend against invasion and not liable to serve abroad" (1796).
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exceptionable (adj.)

"liable to objection, that may be objected to, objectionable," 1660s (implied in exceptionableness), from exception (in the take exception to sense) + -able. Related: Exceptionably. Compare objectionable.

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rickety (adj.)

"liable to collapse or come clattering down," 1680s, with + -y (2) + rickets, via the notion of "weak, unhealthy, feeble in the joints." The literal sense is from c. 1720 but never was common in English. Of material things, from 1799.

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impressable (adj.)

"liable to be impressed into public service," 1865, from impress (v.2) + -able. Earlier it was used in the sense "capable of receiving impression" and "impressionable." Related: Impressability.

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bed-sore (n.)
"gangrene caused by anemia due to continued pressure," 1833, from bed (n.) + sore (n.). A kind of ulcer liable to afflict persons long confined in bed and unable to change position.
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