Etymology
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merganser (n.)

genus of duck-like water birds of the northern hemisphere, 1752, coined in Modern Latin (1550s), from Latin mergus "waterfowl, diver" (from mergere "to dip, immerse;" see merge (v.)) + anser "goose" (see goose (n.)).

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esker (n.)
"deposit left by a glacial stream," 1852, from Irish eiscir "ridge of gravel."
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American (n.)

1570s, originally "one of the aboriginal peoples discovered in the Western Hemisphere by Europeans," from Modern Latin Americanus, from America (q.v.). The original sense is now Native Americans; the sense of "resident of North America of European (originally British) descent" is from 1765.

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residue (n.)

mid-14c., "the remainder, that which is left after a part is taken," from Old French residu (14c.), from Latin residuum "a remainder, that which is left behind," noun use of neuter of adjective residuus "remaining, left over," from residere "remain behind" (see reside). In law, "what remains of an estate after debts, etc. have been paid," early 15c. The Latin original residuum also sometimes was used in English, especially in reference to the physical matter left after any process.

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toucan (n.)

bright-colored bird of South America, 1560s, from French toucan (1550s) and Spanish tucan; from Tupi (Brazil) tuka, tukana, said to be probably imitative of its call. The constellation Tucana was one of the 11 added to Ptolemy's list in the 1610s by Flemish cartographer Petrus Plancius (1552-1622) after Europeans began to explore the Southern Hemisphere.

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leftism (n.)
1917, from left in the political sense + -ism.
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residual (adj.)

"formed by subtraction of one quantity from another, of or like a residuum," 1560s, from residue + -al (1), or from French résiduel, from Latin residuum "that which is left behind." By c. 1600 as "remaining, left over."

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pock-mark (n.)

also pockmark, "scar or pit left by a pustule," especially from smallpox, 1670s, from pock (n.) + mark (n.). As a verb from 1756. Related: Pockmarked; pock-marked "pitted or marked with smallpox or pits resembling those left by it (1756); earlier was pokbrokyn (mid-15c.).

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coal-tar (n.)

"thick, black, viscid liquid left by the distillation of gas from coal," 1785, from coal (n.) + tar (n.).

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discretionary (adj.)

"left to discretion, restrained only by judgment," 1680s (implied in discretionarily); see discretion + -ary.

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