Etymology
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lere (v.)

OE læran, Kentish leran "to teach" (cognate with Old Frisian lera, Old Saxon lerian, Dutch leeren, Old High German leran, German lehren "to teach"), literally "to make known;" see lore). From early 13c. as "to learn."

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didactic (adj.)

"fitted or intended for instruction; pertaining to instruction," 1650s, from French didactique, from Latinized form of Greek didaktikos "apt at teaching," from didaktos "taught," past participle of didaskein "teach," from PIE *dens- "to learn" (source also of Sanskrit dasra- "effecting miracles"). Related: Didactical; didactically.

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Mishnaic (adj.)

1718, "of or belonging to the Mishnah," the collection of binding precepts and ancient rabbinical decisions forming the basis of the Talmud, from Hebrew, literally "repetition, instruction," from shanah "to repeat," in post-Biblical Hebrew "to teach or learn (oral tradition)."

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master (v.)

c. 1200, maistren, "to get the better of, prevail against; reduce to subjugation," from master (n.) and also from Old French maistriier, Medieval Latin magistrare. Meaning "acquire complete knowledge of, overcome the difficulties of, learn so as to be able to apply or use" is from 1740s. Related: Mastered; mastering.

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studious (adj.)
mid-14c. (implied in studiously) "zealous, diligent, eager," from Latin studiosus "devoted to study, assiduous, zealous," from studium "eagerness, zeal" (see study). From late 14c. as "eager to learn, devoted to learning," also, as noun, "those who study or read diligently." Related: Studiousness.
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aptitude (n.)
early 15c., "tendency, likelihood," from Late Latin aptitudo (genitive aptitudinis) "fitness," noun of quality from Latin aptus "joined, fitted" (see apt). Meaning "natural capacity to learn" is 1540s; that of "state or quality of being fit (for a purpose or position)" is from 1640s. Related: Aptitudinal. A doublet of attitude.
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diagnostic (adj.)

1620s, "of or pertaining to diagnosis," also as a noun, "a symptom of value in diagnosis," from Greek diagnōstikos "able to distinguish," from diagnōstos, verbal adjective from diagignōskein "to discern, distinguish," literally "to know thoroughly" or "know apart (from another)," from dia "between" (see dia-) + gignōskein "to learn, to come to know," from PIE root *gno- "to know." Related: Diagnostics.

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memorize (v.)

1590s, "commit to writing, cause to be remembered by writing or inscription;" see memory + -ize. The meaning "commit to memory, learn by heart, keep in memory, have always in mind" is by 1838. Related: Memorized; memorist; memorizing.

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docility (n.)

1550s, "readiness or aptness to learn," from French docilité (15c.), from Latin docilitatem (nominative docilitas) "teachableness," from docilis "easily taught," from docere "to show, teach, cause to know," originally "make to appear right," causative of decere "be seemly, fitting," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept." Meaning "submissiveness to management" is from c. 1600.

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inquiry (n.)
early 15c., enquery, "a judicial examination of facts to determine truth;" mid-15c. in general sense "attempt to learn something, act or fact of inquiring," probably an Anglo-French noun developed from enqueren "to inquire" (see inquire). Respelled from mid-16c. to conform to Latin.
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