Etymology
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foliate (adj.)
1620s, "beaten into thin sheets," from Medieval Latin foliatus "leaved, leafy," from Latin folium "a leaf" (see folio). As "leaf-like" from 1650s.
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folio (n.)
mid-15c., from Late Latin folio "leaf or sheet of paper," from Latin folio, ablative of folium "leaf" (source also of Italian foglia, French feuille, Spanish hoja), from PIE *bhol-yo- "leaf" (source also of Greek phyllon "leaf," Gaelic bile "leaflet, blossom"), suffixed form of root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom." Ablative of location, because this was used in page references. Meaning "volume of the largest size" first attested 1620s.
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pine-needle (n.)

"acicular leaf of the pine tree," 1834, from pine (n.) + needle (n.).

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foliation (n.)
1620s, from Latin foliat-, stem of folium "a leaf" (see folio).
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feuillemorte (adj.)
"of the color of a dead leaf," 1640s, fieulamort, from French feuille morte, literally "dead leaf" (see folio + mortal (adj.)). A word of loose spelling, variants include phyllamort, filemot, philomot.
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betel (n.)
1550s, name of a creeping or climbing plant of the East Indies, also of its leaf (1580s), which is chewed, probably via Portuguese betel, from Malayalam (Dravidian) vettila, from veru ila "simple leaf."
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phyllo (n.)

also filo, "extremely thin sheet pastry used in Greek and Near Eastern cookery," by 1974, from Modern Greek phyllon "leaf," from PIE *bhol-yo- "leaf," suffixed form of root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom."

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milfoil (n.)

"yarrow," a composite herb, mid-13c., from Old French milfoil, from Latin millefolium, literally "thousand leaf," so called from the abundance of its leaves; from mille "thousand" (see million) + folium "leaf" (from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom").

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exfoliate (v.)

1610s, transitive, "to cast off, shed" (a surface); 1670s, intransitive, "to separate or come off in thin, leaf-like layers;" from Late Latin exfoliatus, past participle of exfoliare "to strip of leaves," from ex "off, out of" (see ex-) + folium "leaf" (from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom"). Related: Exfoliated; exfoliating.

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chard (n.)

"blanched leaf of artichoke," 1650s, from French carde "chard" (14c.), perhaps via Provençal, from Latin carduus "thistle, artichoke" (see cardoon).

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