Etymology
Advertisement
laugh (n.)
1680s, "action of laughing," from laugh (v.). The older noun form is laughter. Meaning "a cause of laughter" is from 1895; ironic use (in that's a laugh) attested from 1930. Laugh track "pre-recorded laughter on a TV program" is from 1961.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
face-value (n.)
1842, from face (n.) + value (n.). Originally of stock shares, banknotes, etc.
Related entries & more 
NASDAQ 
U.S. stock exchange, founded 1971, an acronym from National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations.
Related entries & more 
litotes (n.)
rhetorical figure in which an affirmative is expressed by the negative of its contrary ("no laughing matter"), from Greek litotes "plainness, simplicity," from litos "smooth, plain," also "frugal, small, meager," and, of style, "simple, unadorned," from PIE root *(s)lei- "slimy, sticky, slippery" (hence "smooth"); see slime (n.).
Related entries & more 
tiller (n.1)
mid-14c., "stock of a crossbow," from Old French telier "stock of a crossbow" (c. 1200), originally "weaver's beam," from Medieval Latin telarium, from Latin tela "web; loom," from PIE *teks-la-, from root *teks- "to weave," also "to fabricate." Meaning "bar to turn the rudder of a boat" first recorded 1620s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
stocky (adj.)
c. 1400, "made of wood," from stock (n.1). Of plants, "of stout and sturdy growth" (not weedy) it is recorded from 1620s. Of persons, "thick-set," 1670s, suggestive of tree trunks, but compare also stock in sense of "trunk of the human body" (late 14c.).
Related entries & more 
breed (n.)
"race, lineage, stock from the same parentage" (originally of animals), 1550s, from breed (v.). Of persons, from 1590s. Meaning "kind, species" is from 1580s.
Related entries & more 
crack-up (n.)

1926, in reference to airplane crashes; 1936, "disintegration under stress, mental collapse" [Fitzgerald]; from the verbal phrase, from crack (v.) + up (adv.). The verbal phrase in the meaning "to break up laughing" is by 1967, transitive and intransitive. Its earliest sense was "to praise extravagantly" (as in not all it's cracked up to be).

Related entries & more 
nitrous (adj.)

c. 1600, "of nitre, pertaining to nitre," from Latin nitrosus, from nitrum (see nitre). The more precise use in chemistry (designating a compound in which the nitrogen has a lower valence than the corresponding nitric compound) is from 1780s. Middle English had nitrose "nitrous in quality; bitter, sour" (early 15c.). Nitrous oxide "laughing gas" is attested from 1800.

When inhaled it produces unconsciousness and insensibility to pain; hence it is used as an anesthetic during short surgical operations. When it is breathed diluted with air an exhilarating or intoxicating effect is produced under the influence of which the inhaler is irresistibly impelled to do all kinds of silly and extravagant acts; hence the old name of laughing-gas. [Century Dictionary, 1895]
Related entries & more 
derision (n.)

"ridicule, mockery, subjection to ridicule or mockery," c. 1400, from Old French derision "derision, mockery" (13c.), from Latin derisionem (nominative derisio) "a laughing to scorn, mockery," noun of action from past-participle stem of deridere "ridicule," from de "down" (see de-) + ridere "to laugh" (see risible).

Related entries & more 

Page 3