Etymology
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masseur (n.)

"man who works giving massages," 1876, from French masseur, masc. agent noun from masser (see massage (n.)). Native massagist (1885), massager (1902) have not displaced it, though the latter is used in purely mechanical and figurative senses.

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provenience (n.)

"origin, place from which something comes," 1881, a Latinization of provenance, or else from Latin provenientem (nominative proveniens), present participle of provenire "come forth" (see provenance). "Preferred to PROVENANCE by those who object to the French form of the latter" [OED].

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gauze (n.)
1560s, gais, from French gaze, which is of uncertain origin. It has been conjectured to be from Arabic gazz "raw silk" [Barnhart], or from Gaza, Palestinian city associated with production of this fabric [Klein, Du Cagne], but Century Dictionary calls the latter conjecture, and there has been no evidence for either.
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introjection (n.)
1856, in medicine, from intro- "on the inside, within" + stem abstracted from projection, interjection. In philosophical (1892) and psychoanalytical (1911) uses, from German introjektion; in the former sense the coinage is credited to Swiss-German philosopher Richard Avenarius (1843-1896), in the latter Sándor Ferenczi (1873-1933).
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informant (n.)
1690s, "someone who supplies information," from Latin informantem (nominative informans), present participle of informare "train, instruct, educate" (see inform). Occasionally as "one who gives information to the authorities, one who dishonorably betrays knowledge gained in confidence" (1783). Informer is older in both senses and more usual in the latter. As an adjective from 1890.
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per (prep.)

"through, by means of," 1580s (earlier in various Latin and French phrases, in the latter often par), from Latin per "through, during, by means of, on account of, as in," from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through, in front of, before, first, chief, toward, near, around, against."

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bibliomaniac (n.)

"one mad for books, an enthusiastic collector of rare or unusual books," 1811; see bibliomania. Earlier was bibliomane (1777), from French.

A bibliomaniac must be carefully distinguished from a bibliophile. The latter has not yet freed himself from the idea that books are meant to be read. [Walsh]
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boo-ya (interj.)

also booyah, exclamation used in various situations, attested c. 1990 in hip-hop slang and to have been popularized by U.S. sports announcer Stuart Scott (1965-2015) on ESPN's SportsCenter. A 1991 magazine article has booyah as a Wisconsin word for "bouillon," based on an inability to spell the latter.

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forwards (adv.)
c. 1400, from forward (adv.) + adverbial genitive -s. British English until mid-20c. preserved the distinction between forward and forwards, the latter expressing "a definite direction viewed in contrast with other directions." In American English, however, forward prevails in all senses since Webster (1832) damned forwards as "a corruption."
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vibrato 

1861 (adv.), 1870 (n.), "tremulous effect in music," from Italian vibrato, from Latin vibratus, past participle of vibrare "to vibrate" (from PIE root *weip- "to turn, vacillate, tremble ecstatically").

Strictly, the vibrato is distinct from the tremolo, in that the latter involves a perceptible variation in pitch; but in common usage the terms are made synonymous. [Century Dictionary]
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