Etymology
Advertisement
giglot (n.)
"lewd, wanton woman" (mid-14c.); later "a giddy, romping girl;" of unknown origin; compare gig (n.1).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
one-off (n.)

"single example of a manufactured product," by 1927, from one + off. Later given figurative extension.

Related entries & more 
extremely (adv.)
1530s, from extreme + -ly (2). Originally "with great severity," later more loosely, "in extreme degree" (1570s).
Related entries & more 
lineman (n.)
1858, worker on telegraph (later telephone) lines, from line (n.) + man (n.). U.S. football sense is from 1894.
Related entries & more 
roadhouse (n.)
"inn by a roadside," 1857, later "place for refreshment and entertainment along a road" (1922), from road (n.) + house (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lasciviousness (n.)
1590s, from lascivious + -ness. An earlier noun form was lascivity (c. 1500); a later one was lascivency (1660s).
Related entries & more 
theist (n.)
1660s, from Greek theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + -ist. The original senses was that later reserved to deist: "one who believes in a transcendent god but denies revelation." Later in 18c. theist was contrasted with deist, as believing in a personal God and allowing the possibility of revelation.
Related entries & more 
warhead (n.)
also war-head, 1898, "explosive part of a torpedo," from war (n.) + head (n.). Later transferred to any missile (1944).
Related entries & more 
complimentary (adj.)

1620s, "intended to express or convey a compliment," from compliment (n.) + -ary. In later use loosely meaning "free of charge."

Related entries & more 
half-dime (n.)
U.S. silver coin minted from 1792 to 1873; originally half-disme; later form by 1800; from half + dime.
Related entries & more 

Page 3