Etymology
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moorland (n.)

"tract of waste land," Old English morlond; see moor (n.) + land (n.).

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landsman (n.)

1590s, "man of the same country," from genitive of land (n.) + man (n.). From 1660s as "one who lives on land and has little experience of the sea."

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southland (n.)

Old English suðland, see south + land (n.).

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landmine (n.)

also land-mine, "explosive device placed on the ground (or just under it) as a weapon," 1871, from land (n.) + mine (n.2).

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shoreland (n.)

"land bordering the shore," by 1807, from shore (n.) + land (n.).

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Thailand 

from Thai, indigenous name of the inhabitants, + land (n.). Also see Siam.

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marshland (n.)

"a marshy district," Old English mersclond; see marsh + land (n.).

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northland (n.)

"northern part of a country," Old English norþ-lond; see north + land (n.).

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Poland (n.)

1560s, from Pole + land (n.). Related: Polander.

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motherland (n.)

also mother-land, "land of one's origin, land whence a people originated," 1711, from mother (n.1) + land (n.).

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