Etymology
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insecurity (n.)
1640s, "state of being unsafe," also "lack of assurance or confidence, apprehension," from Medieval Latin insecuritas, from insecurus (see insecure). Specific psychological sense is by 1917.
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maladjustment (n.)

"faulty adjustment, lack of adjustment," 1823, from mal- + adjustment. In a psychological sense, "unsuccessful adaptation to one's social environment," by 1899.

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improvidence (n.)
"lack of foresight, rashness," mid-15c., from Late Latin improvidentia, from assimilated form of in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Latin providentia "foresight, precaution" (see providence).
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decompensation (n.)

"lack or loss of compensation," especially, in medicine, "deterioration of a structure that had worked through compensation," 1900, from de- + compensation.

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deprived (adj.)
1550s, "dispossessed," past-participle adjective from deprive. As a euphemism for the condition of children who lack a stable home life, by 1945.
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immaturity (n.)
1530s, "untimeliness," from Latin immaturitatem (nominative immaturitas) "unripeness," from immaturus "unripe, untimely" (see immature). Meaning "lack of maturity" attested from c. 1600.
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disproportion (n.)

"want of proportion of one thing to another, lack of symmetry," 1550s; see dis- + proportion. Perhaps from or based on French disproportion (16c.). As a verb from 1590s. Related: Disproportioned.

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incapacity (n.)
1610s, "lack of ability, powerlessness," from French incapacité (16c.), from Medieval Latin incapacitatem (nominative incapacitas), from Late Latin incapax (genitive incapacis) "incapable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Latin capax "capable," literally "able to hold much," from capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." As a legal term (1640s), "lack of qualification," referring to inability to take, receive, or deal with in some way.
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disaffect (v.)

1620s, "lack affection for" (a sense now obsolete); 1640s, "alienate the affection of, make less friendly" (the main modern sense), from dis- + affect (v.1). Related: Disaffected; disaffecting.

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insipience (n.)
early 15c., "lack of wisdom, foolishness," from Old French insipience (15c.) or directly from Latin insipientia "folly, unwisdom," from insipientem "unwise, foolish" (see insipient).
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