Etymology
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coruscate (v.)

"emit, vivid flashes of light," 1705, from Latin coruscatus, past participle of coruscare "to vibrate, glitter," perhaps from PIE *(s)ker- (2) "leap, jump about" (compare scherzo), but de Vaan considers this "a long shot." Related: Coruscated; coruscating.

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lutz (n.)
type of skating jump, 1932, from the name Alois Lutz, "an obscure Austrian skater of the 1920s" [James R. Hines, "Historical Dictionary of Figure Skating," 2011], who is said to have first performed it in 1913. The surname is from a form of Ludwig.
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jounce (v.)
"to jolt or shake," especially by rough riding, mid-15c., of unknown origin, perhaps a blend of jump and bounce. "Several words in -ounce, as bounce, flounce, pounce, trounce are of obscure history" [OED]. Related: Jounced; jouncing. The noun is 1787, from the verb.
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broad (n.)

c. 1300, "breadth" (obsolete), from broad (adj.). Sense of "shallow, reedy lake formed by the expansion of a river over a flat surface" is a Norfolk dialect word from 1650s. Meaning "the broad part" of anything is by 1741.

Slang sense of "woman" is by 1911, perhaps suggestive of broad hips, but it also might trace to American English abroadwife, word for a woman (often a slave) away from her husband. Earliest use of the slang word suggests immorality or coarse, low-class women. Because of this negative association, and the rise of women's athletics, the track and field broad jump (1863) was changed to the long jump c. 1967.

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buck (v.1)
of a horse, "make a violent back-arched leap in an effort to throw off a rider," 1848, apparently "jump like a buck," from buck (n.1). Related: Bucked; bucking. Buck up "cheer up" is from 1844, probably from the noun in the "man" sense.
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resile (v.)

1520s, "to draw back," of persons, from obsolete French resiler "withdraw from an agreement," or directly from Latin resilire "to jump back" (see resilience). The meaning "spring back, start back, recoil" (of material things, especially elastic bodies) is from 1708. Related: Resiled; resiling.

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ballet (n.)
"theatrical, costumed dance and pantomime performance telling a story and representing characters and passions by gestures and groupings," 1660s, from French ballette from Italian balletto, diminutive of ballo "a dance," from Late Latin ballare "to dance," from Greek ballizein "to dance, jump about" (see ball (n.2)).
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upstart (n.)
1550s, "one newly risen from a humble position to one of power, importance, or rank, a parvenu," also start-up, from up (adv.) + start (v.) in the sense of "jump, spring, rise." As an adjective from 1560s. Compare the archaic verb upstart "to spring to one's feet," attested from c. 1300.
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sprint (v.)
1560s, "to spring, dart," probably an alteration of sprenten "to leap, spring" (early 14c.), from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse spretta "to jump up" (cognate with Swedish spritta "to start, startle"). Meaning "to run a short distance at full speed" first recorded 1871. Related: Sprinted; sprinting.
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ukulele (n.)
1896, from Hawaiian 'ukulele, literally "leaping flea," from 'uku "louse, flea" + lele "to fly, jump, leap." Noted earlier in English as the Hawaiian word for "flea." The instrument so called from the rapid motion of the fingers in playing it. It developed from a Portuguese instrument introduced to the islands c. 1879.
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