Etymology
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sup (v.2)
"to sip, to take into the mouth with the lips," Old English supan (West Saxon), suppan, supian (Northumbrian) "to sip, taste, drink, swallow" (strong verb, past tense seap, past participle sopen), from Proto-Germanic *supanan (source also of Old Norse supa "to sip, drink," Middle Low German supen, Dutch zuipen "to drink, tipple," Old High German sufan, German saufen "to drink, booze"), from PIE *sub-, possibly an extended form of root *seue- (2) "to take liquid" (source also of Sanskrit sunoti "presses out juice," soma; Avestan haoma, Persian hom "juice;" Greek huetos "rain," huein "to rain;" Latin sugere "to suck," succus "juice, sap;" Lithuanian sula "flowing sap;" Old Church Slavonic soku "sap," susati "suck;" Middle Irish suth "sap;" Old English seaw "sap").
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wallbanger (n.)
cocktail made from vodka, Galliano, and orange juice, by 1969, in full Harvey wallbanger. Probably so called from its effect on the locomotive skills of the consumer.
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silphium (n.)
plant genus, 1771, from Latin, from Greek Silphion, name of a North African Mediterranean plant whose identity has been lost, the gum or juice of which was prized by the ancients as a condiment and a medicine. Probably of African origin.
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tapioca (n.)
1640s, tipiaca, from Portuguese or Spanish tapioca, from Tupi (Brazil) tipioca "juice of a pressed cassava," from tipi "residue, dregs" + og, ok "to squeeze out" (from roots of the cassava plant).
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meconium (n.)

"dark fecal discharge from a newborn infant," 1706, from Latin meconium "excrement of a newborn child," literally "poppy juice," from Greek mēkōnion "poppy-juice, opium," diminutive of mēkōn "poppy," which perhaps is related to Old Church Slavonic maku, German Mohn "poppy," and is perhaps of Pre-Greek origin. "As the poppy originates from the Mediterranean according to botanists, it is often thought that we are dealing with a 'Wanderwort', which was borrowed into lndoEuropean at PIE date" [Beekes]. The discharge was so called by classical physicians for its resemblance. Related: Meconial.

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succinite (n.)
1816, "amber-colored mineral," from -ite (1) + Latin succinum "amber," which Klein calls a loan word from a Northern European language that has been assimilated in form to Latin succus, sucus "juice, sap." Related: Succinic, from French succinique.
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daiquiri (n.)

alcoholic drink made with rum, lime juice, and sugar, 1920 (F. Scott Fitzgerald), from Daiquiri, name of a district or village in eastern Cuba. Said to have been invented by a U.S. mining engineer in Cuba in 1896.

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sherbet (n.)
c. 1600, zerbet, "drink made from diluted fruit juice and sugar," and cooled with fresh snow when possible, from Turkish serbet, from Persian sharbat, from Arabic sharba(t) "a drink," from shariba "he drank." Formerly also sherbert. Related to syrup, and compare sorbet.
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pulque (n.)

fermented drink in Mexico and parts of Central America made from the juice of the agave, 1690s, from American Spanish pulque, a word of unknown origin, said to be a word from Araucanian (native language spoken in part of Chile), or else from some language of Mexico.

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pepsin (n.)

also pepsine, "fermin found in gastric juice, used medicinally for cases of indigestion," 1844, coined in German (Theodor Schwann, 1835) from Greek pepsis "digestion; a cooking," from stem pep- (see peptic) + -in (2).

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