Etymology
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congratulate (v.)

"address with expressions of sympathetic pleasure," 1540s, from Latin congratulatus, past participle of congratulari "wish joy," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor"). Related: Congratulated; congratulating; congratulable.

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cheerless (adj.)

"devoid of comfort, without joy," 1570s, from cheer (n.) + -less. Related: Cheerlessly; cheerlessness.

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gratulate (v.)
archaic, 1550s, from Latin gratulatus, past participle of gratulari "give thanks, show joy" (see gratulation).
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rejoicing (n.)

"feelings and expressions of joy, exultation, or gladness," late 14c., rejoising, verbal noun from rejoice (v.). Related: Rejoicingly. Rejoicement (1560s) seems not to have caught on.

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ananda (n.)
in Hindu theology, "bliss," from Sanskrit ananda- "joy, happiness, bliss," from stem of nandati "he rejoices," which is of unknown origin.
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bliss (n.)
Old English blis, also bliðs "bliss, merriment, happiness, grace, favor," from Proto-Germanic *blithsjo (source also of Old Saxon blidsea, blizza), from *blithiz "gentle, kind" (see blithe) + *-tjo noun suffix. Originally mostly of earthly happiness, in later Old English of spiritual joy, perfect felicity, the joy of heaven; influenced by association with unrelated bless.
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exultation (n.)

"act of exulting, great gladness, triumphant delight," late 14c., exultacioun, from Old French exultacion "joyousness, exultation" and directly from Latin exultationem/exsultationem "a leaping for joy, exultation," noun of action from past-participle stem of exultare/exsultare (see exult). The notion is of leaping or dancing for joy. An Old English word for it was heahbliss "high bliss."

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jubilate (v.)
"make a joyful noise," 1640s, from Latin iubilatus, past participle of iubilare "shout for joy" (see jubilant). Related: Jubilated; jubilating.
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listless (adj.)
"languid and unresponsive, slothful," mid-15c., from Middle English liste "pleasure, joy, delight" (see list (v.4)) + -less. Spenser, if no one else, tried listful (1590s). Related: Listlessly; listlessness.
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yodel (v.)
"sing by sudden changing to and from falsetto," 1827, from German jodeln, from dialectal German jo, an exclamation of joy, of imitative origin. As a noun from 1849.
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