Etymology
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congratulation (n.)

mid-15c., from Latin congratulationem (nominative congratulatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of congratulari "wish joy," from com "together, with" (see com-) + gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

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jubilant (adj.)
1660s (Milton), from Latin iubilantem (nominative iubilans), present participle of iubilare "to let out whoops," in Christian writers, "to shout for joy," related to iubilum "wild shout," from Proto-Italic *iu, an exclamation of joy that probably was in Proto-Indo-European (cognates: Greek iu, an interjection of amazement, iuge "crying;" Middle High German ju, juch, an exclamation of joy; Dutch juichen, Old Norse yla, English yowl). With ending as in sibilant. Related: Jubilantly.
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congratulate (v.)

"address with expressions of sympathetic pleasure," 1540s, from Latin congratulatus, past participle of congratulari "wish joy," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor"). Related: Congratulated; congratulating; congratulable.

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cheerless (adj.)

"devoid of comfort, without joy," 1570s, from cheer (n.) + -less. Related: Cheerlessly; cheerlessness.

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gratulate (v.)
archaic, 1550s, from Latin gratulatus, past participle of gratulari "give thanks, show joy" (see gratulation).
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rejoicing (n.)

"feelings and expressions of joy, exultation, or gladness," late 14c., rejoising, verbal noun from rejoice (v.). Related: Rejoicingly. Rejoicement (1560s) seems not to have caught on.

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Comus 

late classical god of joy and festive mirth, 1630s, from Latin, from Greek komos "a revel, merrymaking, a band of revelers" (see comedy).

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ananda (n.)
in Hindu theology, "bliss," from Sanskrit ananda- "joy, happiness, bliss," from stem of nandati "he rejoices," which is of unknown origin.
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bliss (n.)
Old English blis, also bliðs "bliss, merriment, happiness, grace, favor," from Proto-Germanic *blithsjo (source also of Old Saxon blidsea, blizza), from *blithiz "gentle, kind" (see blithe) + *-tjo noun suffix. Originally mostly of earthly happiness, in later Old English of spiritual joy, perfect felicity, the joy of heaven; influenced by association with unrelated bless.
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exultation (n.)

"act of exulting, great gladness, triumphant delight," late 14c., exultacioun, from Old French exultacion "joyousness, exultation" and directly from Latin exultationem/exsultationem "a leaping for joy, exultation," noun of action from past-participle stem of exultare/exsultare (see exult). The notion is of leaping or dancing for joy. An Old English word for it was heahbliss "high bliss."

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