Etymology
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bebop (n.)
1944, from bebop, rebop, bop, nonsense words in jazz lyrics, attested from at least 1928. The style is associated with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie.
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way-out (adj.)
1868, "far off," from way (adv.), short for away, + out. Sense of "original, bold," is jazz slang from 1940s, probably suggesting "far off" from what is conventional or expected.
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gut-bucket (adj.)
in reference to jazz, "earthy," by 1929, supposedly originally a reference to the buckets which caught the drippings, or gutterings, from barrels. Which would connect it to gutter (v.).
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combo (n.)

1929, U.S. slang, originally in entertainment (jazz groups, dance teams), short for combination, which was used by 1924 in the sense "small instrumental band."

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Big Apple (n.)
"New York City," 1909 (but popularized by 1970s tourism promotion campaign), apparently from jazz musicians' use of apple for any city, especially a Northern one.
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uptight (adj.)
"tense," slang, 1934, from up- + tight (adj.). Meaning "straight-laced" first recorded 1969. It was used in a sense of "excellent" in jazz slang c. 1962.
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jive (n.)
"empty, misleading talk;" also a style of fast, lively jazz and dance music," 1928, American English, from jive (v.1). Used from 1938 for "New York City African-American slang."
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reet (adj.)

"good, proper, excellent," 1934, jazz slang, from American English dialectal pronunciation of right (adj.1). An identical dialectal form of the word was in 19c. English as "smooth, put in order, comb (the hair)."

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red-hot (adj.)

late 14c., "red with heat, heated till it glows red" (of metal, etc.); in reference to persons, "lively, passionate," it is recorded from c. 1600. Red-hot mama is 1926, jazz slang, "earthy female singer," also "girlfriend, lover."

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nitty-gritty (n.)

"basic facts of a situation or problem," by 1961, knitty-gritty, American English, said to have been chiefly used by black jazz musicians, perhaps ultimately from nit and grits "finely ground corn." As an adjective from 1966.

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