Etymology
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libidinal (adj.)

in psychology jargon, 1922, in Joan Riviere's translation of Freud, from combining form of libido (Latin genitive libidinis) + -al (1).

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fracking (n.)

along with frack (v.), by 2000 in engineering jargon, short for hydraulic fracturing and with a -k- to keep the -c- hard.

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Runyonesque (adj.)

by 1938 in reference to Damon Runyon (1884-1946), U.S. writer of popular crime stories featuring tough characters and underworld jargon.

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mindset (n.)

also mind-set, "habits of mind formed by previous experience," 1916, in educators' and psychologists' jargon; see mind (n.) + set (n.2).

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dicey (adj.)

"risky, uncertain" (as the roll of dice), 1940s, aviators' jargon, from dice (n.) + -y (2). Related: Diciness.

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no-name (adj.)

1978, "not having made a name in one's profession," originally American English sporting jargon, from no + name (n.). As a noun, by 1984.

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cisgender (adj.)

also cis-gender, "not transgender," in general use by 2011, in the jargon of psychological journals from 1990s, from cis- "on this side of" + gender.

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muck-a-muck (n.)

"(self-)important person," 1912, short for Chinook jargon high muck-a-muck, literally "plenty of food" from muckamuck "food" (1847), which is of unknown origin. Also mucky-muck; muckety-muck.

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liveware (n.)

"people," 1966, computer-programmer jargon, from live (adj.) + ending abstracted from software, etc. Compare old nautical slang live lumber "landsmen on board a ship" (1785).

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