Etymology
Advertisement
self-sustaining (adj.)

"supporting oneself or itself without extraneous help," 1650s, from self- + present participle of sustain (v.). Related: Self-sustained (1742).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
natron (n.)

"native carbonate of sodium," 1680s, from French natron (1660s), which is said to be directly from Arabic natrun, itself from Greek nitron, itself possibly of Eastern origin (see nitre). Medieval Latin and Paracelsus (16c.) had a form anatron, from Arabic with the article assimilated (an-natron). It is the source of the chemical symbol Na for sodium and the word-forming element natro-, used in the names of minerals to indicate the presence of sodium.

Related entries & more 
occasionally (adv.)
c. 1400, "happening on some particular occasion," also "sometimes, happening as occasion presents itself, without regularity," from occasional + -ly (2).
Related entries & more 
AIDS (n.)
1982, acronym formed from acquired immune deficiency syndrome. AIDS cocktail attested by 1997, the thing itself said to have been in use from 1995.
Related entries & more 
bull-baiting (n.)
1570s, from bull (n.1) + baiting. The activity itself is at least from early 15c. in England; it was made illegal there in 1835.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
self-acting (adj.)

1740, "acting by itself;" see self- + acting (adj.). The mechanical sense of "contrived for superseding manipulation in the management of a machine" is by 1844.

Related entries & more 
squared (adj.)
late 14c., "made square," past-participle adjective from square (v.). Meaning "drawn up in squares" is from 1660s. Of numbers, "multiplied by itself," from 1550s.
Related entries & more 
B.C. 
abbreviation of Before Christ, in chronology, attested by 1823. The phrase itself, Before Christ, in dating, with exact years, is in use by 1660s.
Related entries & more 
humanistic (adj.)
1845 (humanistical is from 1716), in reference to Renaissance or classical humanism; from humanist + -ic. From 1904 in reference to a modern philosophy that concerns itself with the interests of the human race.
Related entries & more 
automat (n.)

"automated cafeteria," 1903, probably from automatic (adj.), though the system itself is said to have originated in Germany, and the word may be from German. Earlier it meant "an automaton" (1670s).

Related entries & more 

Page 3