Etymology
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Q and A 

also Q & A, 1954 (adj.), abbreviation of question and answer (itself attested by 1817 as a noun, by 1839 as an adjective).

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Colin 

masc. proper name, from French Colin, a diminutive of Col, itself a diminutive of Nicolas (see Nicholas). A common shepherd's name in pastoral verse.

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rapacious (adj.)

"of a grasping habit or disposition," 1650s, from Latin rapaci-, stem of rapax "grasping," itself from stem of rapere "to seize" (see rapid) + -ous. Related: Rapaciously; rapaciousness.

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flypaper (n.)
also fly-paper, 1851 (the thing itself is said to have become commonly available in London in 1848), from fly (n.1) + paper (n.).
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entre- 
in words from French, corresponds to English enter-, which is itself from French entre "between, among" (11c.), from Latin inter (see inter-).
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self-sustaining (adj.)

"supporting oneself or itself without extraneous help," 1650s, from self- + present participle of sustain (v.). Related: Self-sustained (1742).

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natron (n.)

"native carbonate of sodium," 1680s, from French natron (1660s), which is said to be directly from Arabic natrun, itself from Greek nitron, itself possibly of Eastern origin (see nitre). Medieval Latin and Paracelsus (16c.) had a form anatron, from Arabic with the article assimilated (an-natron). It is the source of the chemical symbol Na for sodium and the word-forming element natro-, used in the names of minerals to indicate the presence of sodium.

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Marcella 

fem. proper name, Latin, fem. of Marcellus, itself a diminutive of Marcus. Marcellina was the name of a female Gnostic of 2c. and a teacher of Gnosticism in Rome.

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Seconal 

1935, U.S. proprietary name (Eli Lilly & Co.), from Secon(dary) Al(lyl)or else from secobarbital (itself short for secondary barbital).

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occasionally (adv.)
c. 1400, "happening on some particular occasion," also "sometimes, happening as occasion presents itself, without regularity," from occasional + -ly (2).
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