Etymology
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mythology (n.)

early 15c., "exposition of myths, the investigation and interpretation of myths," from Late Latin mythologia, from Greek mythologia "legendary lore, a telling of mythic legends; a legend, story, tale," from mythos "myth" (a word of unknown origin; see myth) + -logia (see -logy "study"). Meaning "a body or system of myths" is recorded by 1781.

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admissible (adj.)

1610s, "allowable," from French admissible, from past participle stem of Latin admittere "allow to enter, admit, give entrance," from ad "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Meaning "capable of being allowed entrance" is from 1775; specific sense of "capable of being used in a legal decision or judicial investigation" is recorded from 1849.

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versed (adj.)

"practiced, conversant, acquainted," c. 1600, from past participle of obsolete verse "to turn over" (a book, subject, etc.) in study or investigation, from French verser "to turn, revolve" as in meditation (12c.), from Latin versare "be employed, busy oneself," literally "to turn to, turn often; think over," frequentative of vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend").

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eugenics (n.)

"doctrine of progress in evolution of the human race, race-culture," 1883, coined (along with adjective eugenic) by English scientist Francis Galton (1822-1911) on analogy of ethics, physics, etc. from Greek eugenes "well-born, of good stock, of noble race," from eu- "good" (see eu-) + genos "birth" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget").

The investigation of human eugenics, that is, of the conditions under which men of a high type are produced. [Galton, "Human Faculty," 1883]
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research (n.)

1570s, "act of searching closely" for a specific person or thing, from French recerche (1530s, Modern French recherche), back-formation from Old French recercher "seek out, search closely" (see research (v.)).

The meaning "diligent scientific inquiry and investigation directed to the discovery of some fact" is attested by 1630s. The general sense of "investigations into things, the habit of making close investigations" is by 1690s. The phrase research and development for "work on a large scale toward innovation" is recorded from 1923.

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observation (n.)

late 14c., observacioun, "the performance of a religious rite," from Old French observation (c. 1200) and directly from Latin observationem (nominative observatio) "a watching over, observance, investigation," noun of action from past-participle stem of observare "watch over, note, heed, look to, attend to, guard, regard, comply with," from ob "in front of, before" (see ob-) + servare "to watch, keep safe," from PIE root *ser- (1) "to protect." Sense of "act or fact of paying attention" is from 1550s. Meaning "a remark in reference to something observed" is recorded from 1590s.

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scrutiny (n.)

early 15c., "the formal enumerating of the votes in an election to an office or dignity" (according to OED, "Now chiefly in Canon Law"), from Late Latin scrutinium "a search, inquiry" (in Medieval Latin, "a mode of election by ballot"), from Latin scrutari "to examine, investigate, search" (from PIE root *skreu- "to cut; cutting tool;" see shred (n.)). The meaning "close investigation or examination" is recorded from c. 1600.

Perhaps the original notion of the Latin word is "to search among rubbish," via scruta (plural) "trash, rags, rubbish" ("shreds"); or the original sense might be "to cut into, scratch."

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animadversion (n.)
1590s, "criticism, blame, reproof; a critical commentary," also sometimes in early use simply "notice, attention, perception of an object" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin animadversionem (nominative animadversio) "investigation, inquiry; perception, observation," noun of action from past participle stem of animadverte "to take cognizance of," literally "to turn the mind to," from animum, accusative of animus "the mind" (see animus), + advertere "turn to" (see advertise). The sense of "take notice of as a fault" was in Latin and animadverto at times was a euphemism for "to punish with death."
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inquire (v.)
c. 1300, enqueren, anqueren, "to ask (a question), ask about, ask for (specific information); learn or find out by asking, seek information or knowledge; to conduct a legal or official investigation (into an alleged offense)," from Old French enquerre "ask, inquire about" (Modern French enquérir) and directly from Medieval Latin inquerere, from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + Latin quaerere "ask, seek" (see query (v.)), in place of classical Latin inquirere "seek after, search for, examine, scrutinize." The English word was respelled 14c. on the Latin model, but half-Latinized enquire persists. Related: Inquired; inquiring.
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report (n.)

late 14c., "an account brought by one person to another; rumor, gossip," from Old French report "pronouncement, judgment" (Modern French rapport), from reporter "to tell, relate" (see report (v.)).

By early 15c. as "informative statement by a reputable source, authoritative account." In law, "formal account of a case argued and determined in court," by 1610s. The meaning "formal statement of results of an investigation" is attested by 1660s; sense of "teacher's official statement of a pupil's work and behavior" is from 1873 (report card in the school sense is attested by 1913, American English). The meaning "resounding noise, sound of an explosion or of the discharge of a firearm" is from 1580s.  

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