Etymology
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intolerability (n.)
1590s, from intolerable + -ity or else from Late Latin intolerabilitas, from Latin intolerabilis "that cannot bear; that cannot be borne." Slightly earlier in the same sense was intolerableness.
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intone (v.1)
late 14c., entunen "sing, chant, recite, vocalize," from Old French entoner "to sing, chant" (13c.), from Medieval Latin intonare "sing according to tone," from Latin in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + tonus "tone," from Greek tonos, from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Related: Intoned; intoning.
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intoxication (n.)
c. 1400, intoxigacion "poisoning, administration of poison," from Medieval Latin intoxicationem (nominative intoxicatio) "a poisoning," noun of action from past participle stem of intoxicare "to poison" (see intoxicate). Meaning "state of inebriation" is from 1640s.
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intolerant (adj.)
1735, "unable or unwilling to endure" (a condition, etc.), from Latin intolerantem (nominative intolerans) "not enduring, impatient, intolerant; intolerable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + tolerans, present participle of tolerare "to bear, endure" (see toleration).

Meaning "not disposed to endure contrary opinions or beliefs, impatient of dissent or opposition" is from 1765. Of plants, with reference to deep shade, from 1898. The noun meaning "person or persons who do not favor toleration" is from 1765. Related: Intolerantly.
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intoxicant (n.)
"that which intoxicates," 1798; see intoxicate. Perhaps from Medieval Latin intoxicantem (nominative intoxicans), present participle of intoxicare. As an adjective from 1882.
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intoxicated (adj.)
1550s, "poisoned;" 1570s, "drunk," past-participle adjective from intoxicate (v.).
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intonate (v.2)
"to thunder, rumble," 1620s, from past participle stem of Latin intonare "to thunder, thunder forth," from in- (from PIE root *en "in") + tonare "to thunder" (see thunder (n.)). Related: Intonated; intonating.
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intolerable (adj.)
late 14c., from Latin intolerabilis "that cannot bear; that cannot be borne," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + tolerabilis "that may be endured," from tolerare "to bear, endure" (see toleration). Related: Intolerably.
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intoxicate (v.)
mid-15c., "to poison" (obsolete), from Medieval Latin intoxicatus, past participle of intoxicare "to poison," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + Latin toxicare "to poison," from toxicum "poison" (see toxic). Meaning "make drunk" first recorded 1570s (implied in intoxicated). Figurative sense "excite to a high pitch of feeling" is attested from 1590s. Related: Intoxicating.
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intonate (v.1)
"to intone, recite in a singing voice," 1795, from Medieval Latin intonatus, past participle of intonare "sing according to tone" (see intone). Compare Italian intonare, French entonner. Related: Intonated; intonating.
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