Etymology
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hollow (n.)
"lowland, valley, basin," 1550s, probably a modern formation from hollow (adj.), which is from Old English holh (n.) "cave, den; internal cavity."
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diesel (adj.)

also Diesel, type of internal combustion engine, 1894, named for Rudolf Diesel (1858-1913), German mechanical engineer who designed this type of engine.

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consciousness (n.)

1630s, "internal knowledge," from conscious + -ness. Meaning "state of being aware of what passes in one's own mind" is from 1670s; meaning "state of being aware" of anything is from 1746. Consciousness-raising is attested from 1968.

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rev (v.)

"cause (an engine) to run quickly," especially when not in gear, 1916, from earlier noun (1901), shortening of revolution, in reference to the internal combustion engine. Related: Revved; revving.

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entrails (n.)
"internal parts of animal bodies," c. 1300, from Old French entrailles (12c.), from Late Latin intralia "inward parts, intestines" (8c.), from altered form of Latin interanea, noun use of neuter plural of interaneus "internal, that which is within," from inter "between, among" (from PIE *enter "between, among," comparative of root *en "in").

Latin interanea yielded Late Latin intrania, hence Italian entrango, Spanish entrañas, Old French entraigne; the alternative form that led to the Modern English word evidently is from influence of the Latin neuter plural (collective) adjective suffix -alia (French -aille).
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adeno- 

scientific word-forming element meaning "gland," from Greek adēn "gland," probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *engw- "groin; internal organ" (source also of Latin inguen "groin;" see inguinal).

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turnbuckle (n.)
also turn-buckle, 1703, "catch or fastening for windows and shutters," from turn (v.) + buckle (n.). Meaning "coupling with internal screw threads for connecting metal rods" is attested from 1877.
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in (adj.)
"that is within, internal," 1590s, from in (adv.). Sense of "holding power" (the in party) first recorded c. 1600; that of "exclusive" (the in-crowd, an in-joke) is from 1907 (in-group); that of "stylish, fashionable" (the in thing) is from 1960.
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exhaust (n.)

"waste gas," 1848, originally from steam engines, from exhaust (v.). In reference to internal combustion engines by 1896. Exhaust pipe, which carries away waste gas or steam from an engine, is by 1849.

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inguinal (adj.)

1680s, from French inguinal (16c.) or directly from Latin inguinalis "of the groin," from inguen (genitive inguinis) "groin," from PIE *engw- "groin; internal organ" (which is perhaps also the source of Greek adēn "gland"). Related: Inguinally.

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