Etymology
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ammeter (n.)
instrument for measuring the strength of electric currents, 1882, from ampere + -meter.
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hornpipe (n.)
c. 1400, hornepype, musical instrument formerly used in England, with bell and mouthpiece made of horn, from horn (n.) + pipe (n.1). From late 15c. as the name of a lively country-dance (later especially popular with sailors) originally performed to music from such an instrument.
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spectrograph (n.)
1876, from spectro- + -graph "instrument for recording; something written." Related: Spectrographic; spectrography.
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Mellotron (n.)
type of electronic musical instrument, 1963, from mello(w) + (elec)tron(ic).
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concertina (n.)

"portable, accordion-like musical instrument," 1835, from concert + fem. ending -ina. Invented 1829 by English inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (who also invented the stereoscope and the Wheatstone bridge). Concertina wire attested by 1917, so called from similarity to the musical instrument.

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compressor (n.)

"one who or that which compresses," 1785, in reference to a type of medical instrument, from Latin compressor, agent noun from past-participle stem of comprimere "to squeeze" (see compress (v.)). As a type of surgical instrument, from 1870. As short for air compressor, from 1874.

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applicator (n.)

"instrument for applying anything," 1650s, agent noun from Latin stem of apply (v.).

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pitter (n.)

"instrument for removing stones from cherries and other fruit," by 1868, from pit (n.2).

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woodwind (n.)
1876, from wood (n.) + wind (n.1) in the musical instrument sense. Related: Woodwinds.
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thrum (v.)
"play a stringed instrument," 1590s, from the noun (1550s), of imitative origin. Related: Thrummed; thrumming.
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