Etymology
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antipope (n.)
also anti-pope, early 15c. (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin), from Medieval Latin antipapa, from Greek anti "against, opposite, instead of" (see anti-) + papa (see pope). There have been about 30 of them, the last was Felix V, elected at Basel in 1439.
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plagal (adj.)

denoting a mode or melody in Gregorian music in which the final is in the middle of the compass instead of at the bottom, 1590s, from Medieval Latin plagalis, from plaga "the plagal mode," probably from plagius, from Medieval Greek plagios "plagal," in classical Greek "oblique," from plagos "side" (from PIE root *plak- (1) "to be flat").

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donut (n.)
see doughnut. It turns up as an alternate spelling in U.S. as early as 1870 ("Josh Billings"), common from c. 1920 in names of bakeries. Halliwell ("Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words," 1847) has donnut "a pancake made of dough instead of batter," which Bartlett (1848) writes "is no doubt the same word" as the American one.
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Parousia (n.)

"the Second Coming," 1875, a reference to Matthew xxiv.27, from Greek parousia, literally "presence," from para- (see para- (1)) + ousia "essence," from on, genitive ontos, present participle of einai "to be" (from PIE root *es- "to be"). Parusia, from a Modern Latin form of the Greek word, is a term in rhetoric: "the use of the present tense instead of the past or future, for dramatic effect."

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sang-froid (n.)

also sangfroid, "presence of mind, coolness, mental composure," 1712, from French sang froid, literally "cool blood," from sang "blood" (from Latin sanguis; see sanguinary) + froid "cold" (from Latin frigidus; see frigid). "In the 17th c. the expression was in France often written erroneously sens froid, as if it contained sens "sense" instead of the homophonous sang "blood'." [OED].

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antiphrasis (n.)
in rhetoric, "the use of a word in a sense opposite to its proper meaning; ironic use of a word in sarcasm or humor," 1530s, from Latin antiphrasis, from Greek antiphrasis, from antiphrazein "to express (something) by the opposite," from anti "against, opposite, instead of" (see anti-) + phrazein "to tell, declare, point out, express" (see phrase (n.)). Related: Antiphrastic.
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outlook (n.)

"mental view or survey," 1742, from out- + look (v.). The meaning "prospect for the future" is attested from 1851. Earliest sense was "a place from which an observer looks out or watches anything" (1660s). The literal sense of "vigilant watch, act or practice of looking out" (1815) is rare; look-out being used instead for this.

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pace (prep.)

"with the leave of, by the permission of," 1863, from Latin pace, ablative of pax "peace," as in pace tua "with all deference to you;" from PIE root *pag- "to fasten." "Used chiefly as a courteous or ironical apology for a contradiction or difference of opinion" [OED]. It is sometimes misused as though it means "according to" instead of the opposite.

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brad (n.)
"small flat nail having instead of a head a slight projection on one side," late 13c., brod, from Old Norse broddr "spike, point, arrow," from Proto-Germanic *brozda- (source also of Old English brord "point, prick, blade of grass," Old High German brort "point, edge, crown"), from PIE *bhrs-dh-, from root *bhars- "projectile, point, bristle" (see bristle (n.)).
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antistrophe (n.)
part of an ancient Greek choral ode, 1610s, from Latin, from Greek antistrophe "the returning of the chorus," "answering to a previous [strophe], except that they now moved from left to right instead of from right to left" [Liddell & Scott], literally "a turning about, a turning back," from antistrephein, from anti "opposite, in opposition to; in return" (see anti-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Related: Antistrophic.
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