Etymology
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run-time (n.)

"length of time taken in a particular task," 1974, originally in computing; see run (v.) + time (n.). In computing, run (n.) "instance of execution of a program" is by 1946.

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Anglicism (n.)

1640s, "Englished language; that which is peculiar to England in speech or writing," from Latin Anglicus "of the English" (see Angle) + -ism. As an instance of this, "a word or expression used particularly in England and not in America," from 1781.

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particular (n.)

late 14c., particuler, "a part or section of a whole, an individual circumstance, feature, or factor; an organ or part of the body," from particular (adj.). Meaning "a single instance or matter" is from 1530s; particulars "small details of statement" is from c. 1600.

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inconsiderable (adj.)
1590s, "incalculable;" from 1630s as "not worthy of consideration or notice," from French inconsidérable (16c.), from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + considérable (see considerable). Related: Inconsiderably. OED has found an instance of the rare verb inconsider from 1697.
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imperfection (n.)
late 14c., "incompleteness, deficiency, lack," from Old French imperfeccion "defect; imperfect state" (12c.) and directly from Late Latin imperfectionem (nominative imperfectio) "imperfection," noun of action from Latin imperfectus "imperfect"(see imperfect). Meaning "an instance of being imperfect" is from early 15c.
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expository (adj.)

"serving to explain; setting forth as an instance," 1620s, from Medieval Latin expositorius, from exposit-, past-participle stem of Latin exponere "set forth" (see expound). Earlier in English as a noun meaning "an expository treatise, commentary" (early 15c.). Related: Expositorial.

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-eroo 
"factitious slang suffix" (OED), sometimes affectionate, forming nouns indicating "a humorous or remarkable instance" of what is indicated, in use by 1940s, perhaps from buckaroo. An earlier suffix in a similar sense is -erino (after 1900), apparently from -er + Italian suffix -ino.
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pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (n.)
1962, "A facetious word alleged to mean 'a lung disease caused by the inhalation of very fine silica dust' but occurring chiefly as an instance of a very long word" [OED]. Said in an early reference to have been invented by seventh grade students in Norfolk, Virginia.
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refit (v.)

also re-fit," to fit or prepare again; get refitted," 1660s, from re- "again" + fit (v.). Originally nautical, "to restore (ships) after damages." Related: Refitted; refitting. As a noun, 1799 as "an act or instance of refitting." Earlier nouns were refitment (1706); refitting (1690s).

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ensample (n.)

"precedent to be followed, illustrative instance; a pattern, model," c. 1300, variant of asaumple, from Old French essample "example" (see example). The survival of this variant form is due to its use in New Testament in KJV (1 Peter v.3). Tyndale (1526) there has insample.

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