Etymology
Advertisement
sidelight (n.)
also side-light, c. 1600, "light coming from the side," from side (adj.) + light (n.). Figurative meaning "incidental information on a subject" is attested from 1862.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
posted (adj.)

"supplied with news or full information," 1828, American English, past-participle adjective from post (v.2).

Related entries & more 
debrief (v.)

"obtain information (from someone) at the end of a mission," 1945 (implied in verbal noun de-briefing), from de- + brief (v.). Related: Debriefed.

Related entries & more 
misdirect (v.)

"give erroneous information or instruction to, give a wrong course of direction to," c. 1600, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + direct (v.). Related: Misdirected; misdirecting.

Related entries & more 
spyware (n.)

"software used to obtain covert information about a computer's activities by transmitting data covertly from its hard drive to another computer," by 2000, from spy + ending from software in the computer sense.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
expose (n.)
also exposé, "display of discreditable information," 1803, initially as a French word; noun use of past participle of French exposer "lay open" (see expose (v.)). Earliest use was in reference to Napoleon.
Related entries & more 
q.v. 

abbreviation of the Latin phrase quod vide "which see," placed after a dictionary entry, book title, etc., to refer the reader to it for further information. From neuter of qui "who" + imperative singular of videre "to see."

Related entries & more 
update (v.)
1944, in reference to information, 1952 in reference to persons, from up (adv.) + date (v.1). Related: Updated; updating. The noun is attested from 1967.
Related entries & more 
overstand (v.)

"to stand over or beside," from Old English oferstandan; see over- + stand (v.). In modern Jamaican patois it is used for understand as a better description of the relationship of the person to the information or idea.

Related entries & more 
play-bill (n.)

also playbill, 1670s, "placard displayed as an advertisement of a play," giving more or less information about it, from play (n.) in the theatrical sense + bill (n.1).

Related entries & more 

Page 3