Etymology
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No results were found for influencer. Showing results for influence.
sea-power (n.)

in geopolitics, "nation having international power or influence at sea," by 1849, from sea + power (n.).

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diabolism (n.)

"actions or influence of the Devil; conduct worthy of the Devil," 1610s, from Ecclesiastical Greek diabolos "devil" (see devil (n.)) + -ism.

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Judaeophobia (n.)
"fear or hatred of the Jews; dread of their influence and opposition to their citizenship," 1881, from Judaeo- + -phobia. Related: Judaeophobe; Judaeophobic.
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handicraft (n.)
c. 1200, hændecraft, a corruption (perhaps from influence of handiwork) of Old English handcræft "skill of the hand," from hand (n.) + craft (n.).
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demark (v.)

"mark off, fix the limits or boundaries of," 1650s, abstracted from demarcation and altered by influence of mark (v.).

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frosh (n.)
student colloquial shortening and alteration of freshman, attested from 1908, "perh. under influence of German frosch frog, (dial.) grammar-school pupil" [OED].
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psychosocial (adj.)

also psycho-social, "pertaining to or involving the influence of social factors on a person's mind or behavior," 1891, from psycho- + social (adj.).

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geneva (n.)
1706, alteration (by influence of the Swiss city name) of Dutch genevre, French genière (see gin (n.1)).
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buck (v.3)
1750, "to butt," apparently a corruption of butt (v.) by influence of buck (n.1). Figuratively, of persons, "to resist, oppose," 1857.
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squish (v.)
1640s, probably a variant of squash (v.), perhaps by influence of obsolete squiss "to squeeze or crush" (1550s). Related: Squished; squishing.
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