Etymology
Advertisement
necrophagous (adj.)

"eating or feeding on carrion," 1819, from Medieval Latin necrophagus, from Greek nekrophagos; see necro- "corpse" + -phagous.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
drool (v.)

"drivel, slobber, drip saliva, as an infant does," 1802, drule, apparently a dialectal variant or contraction of drivel. Related: Drooled; drooling. The noun is from 1869.

Related entries & more 
monophagous (adj.)

"eating only one kind of food," by 1849, of insects, from mono- "single" + -phagous "feeding on, eating." Greek monophagos meant "eating once a day."

Related entries & more 
graminivorous (adj.)
"feeding on grass," 1739, from gramini-, combining form of Latin gramen (genitive graminis) "grass, fodder" (see gramineous) + -vorous "eating, devouring."
Related entries & more 
Nina 
fem. proper name; in a Russian context it is a shortening of Annina, diminutive of Greek Anna. In a Spanish context, Niña "child, infant," a nursery word.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
self-feeder (n.)

"one who or that which feeds itself" in any sense, 1877; see self- + feeder. Self-feeding (adj.), "keeping up a constant supply of anything in constant consumption" is attested from 1835.

Related entries & more 
infanticide (n.)

1650s, "the killing of infants," especially the killing of newborns or the unborn; 1670s, "one who kills an infant," from infant + -cide. Perhaps from French infanticide (16c.).

In Christian and Hebrew communities infanticide has always been regarded as not less criminal than any other kind of murder; but in most others, in both ancient and modern times, it has been practised and regarded as even excusable, and in some enjoined and legally performed, as in cases of congenital weakness or deformity among some of the communities of ancient Greece. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
nursling (n.)

also nurseling, "object of a nurse's care, one who is nursed, an infant," 1550s, from nurse (v.) + -ling. Earlier was norseling, in alchemy, "a substance in a preparatory stage" (c. 1500).

Related entries & more 
neonate (n.)

"recently born infant," 1905, coined from neo- "new" + Latin natus "born," past participle of nasci "be born" (Old Latin gnasci), from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget."

Related entries & more 
feed (n.)
"action of feeding," 1570s, from feed (v.). Meaning "food for animals" is first attested 1580s. Meaning "a sumptuous meal" is from 1808. Of machinery, "action of or system for providing raw material" from 1892.
Related entries & more 

Page 3