Etymology
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personalize (v.)

also personalise, "make personal, make (something) more obviously related to a particular individual," 1747, from personal + -ize. Related: Personalized; personalizing.

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single (adj.)
early 14c., "unmarried," from Old French sengle, sangle "alone, unaccompanied; simple, unadorned," from Latin singulus "one, one to each, individual, separate" (usually in plural singuli "one by one"), from PIE *semgolo‑, suffixed (diminutive?) form of root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with." Meaning "consisting of one unit, individual, unaccompanied by others" is from late 14c. Meaning "undivided" is from 1580s. Single-parent (adj.) is attested from 1966.
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proband (n.)

"individual chosen because of the presence of some trait to be studied," 1929, from Latin probandus, gerundive of probare "to make good, esteem good; make credible, show, prove, demonstrate" (see prove).

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pixelation (n.)

also pixellation, graphics display effect in which individual pixels (small, square single-colored display elements that comprise the image) are visible, 1991, from pixel + -ation.

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psychography (n.)

1883, "history of an individual soul; the natural history of the phenomenon of mind," from psycho- + -graphy. Earlier it meant "spirit-writing by the hand of a medium" (1863).

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Congregationalist (n.)

1690s, one of the Christian denomination built on Congregationalism (1716), the system of church government based on autonomy of the individual congregations. See congregational + -ist.

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phenotype (n.)

"the sum total of the observable characteristics of an individual; type of organism distinguishable from others by observable features," 1911, from German phaenotypus (Wilhelm Johannsen, 1909); see pheno- + type (n.). Related: Phenotypic.

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personally (adv.)

late 14c., "in person; by one's own actions," from personal + -ly (2). Sense of "with respect to an individual" is from late 15c. Meaning "as far as I'm concerned" is from 1849.

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proper (adj.)

c. 1300, propre, "adapted to some purpose, fit, apt; commendable, excellent" (sometimes ironic), from Old French propre "own, particular; exact, neat, fitting, appropriate" (11c.) and directly from Latin proprius "one's own, particular to itself," from pro privo "for the individual, in particular," from ablative of privus "one's own, individual" (see private (adj.)) + pro "for" (see pro-). Related: Properly; properness. As an adverb, "very exceedingly," from mid-15c., but since 19c. the use is considered vulgar.

From early 14c. as "belonging or pertaining to oneself; individual; intrinsic;" also as "pertaining to a person or thing in particular, special, specific; distinctive, characteristic;" also "what is by the rules, correct, appropriate, acceptable." From early 15c. as "separate, distinct; itself." Meaning "socially appropriate, decent, respectable" is recorded by 1704.

Proper name "name belonging to or relating to the person or thing in question, name given to an individual of a class for distinction from others of the same class" is from c. 1300, a sense also preserved in astronomical proper motion "change in the apparent places of a celestial object in the sky relative to other stars or planets" (c. 1300). Proper noun is from mid-15c.

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authoritarian (adj.)
"favoring imposed order over freedom," 1862, from authority + -an. Compare authoritative, which originally had this meaning to itself. Noun in the sense of one advocating or practicing the principle of authority over individual freedom is from 1859.
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