Etymology
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plunk (v.)

1805, "to pluck a stringed instrument;" 1808 in sense of "drop down abruptly;" 1888 as "to hit, wound, shoot." Probably of independent imitative origin in each case. Related: Plunked; plunking.

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Colombia 

South American nation, independent from 1819 as part of Gran Colombia (after its breakup in 1830, known as New Granada, then Colombia from 1863); named for Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (Italian Colombo, Portuguese Colom, Spanish Colón). Related: Colombian.

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congregational (adj.)

1630s, "of or pertaining to a congregation," from congregation + -al (1). In reference to Congregationalism, the Protestant movement in which church congregations were self-governing, from 1640s. The term was most used in New England, in Britain they were called Independent.

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Nehru 

in reference to a type of long, narrow jacket with a standing collar (popular in Western fashion late 1960s), 1967, from Jawaharlal Nehru (1889-1964), first prime minister of independent India (1947-1964), who often wore such a jacket in public appearances.

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Malawi 

East African nation, independent under that name since 1964, from the name of an indigenous people. From 1907 to 1964 it was known as Nyasaland, from Lake Nyasa (now Lake Malawi), from the Swahili word for "lake."

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Lucca 
city and region in Italy, formerly an independent state. Anglicized in Middle and early Modern English as Luke. Noted in England for olive oil and lambskins used in hat-making. Related: Lucchese (adj.), the Italian form, alongside English Luccan (mid-15c.).
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throttle (n.)
1540s, "throat;" it appears to be an independent formation from throat, perhaps a diminutive form, not derived directly from the verb. The mechanical sense is first recorded 1872, short for throttle-valve (1824). Full-throttle (allowing maximum speed) is from 1848 in reference to steam engines.
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Chad 

African nation, former French colony (Tchad), independent since 1960, named for Lake Chad, which is from a local word meaning "lake, large expanse of water." An ironic name for such a desert country. Related: Chadian.

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butt (n.6)
"posterior, buttocks, rump," from mid-15c. in cookery, in reference to animal parts, probably from or related to butt (n.1) "thick end," or short for buttock. In modern use chiefly of humans, probably an independent derivation, attested by c. 1860 in U.S. slang.
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satisfice (v.)

1560s, transitive, "to satisfy" (implied in satisficed), altered from satisfy by influence of its Latin root satisfacere. A Northern English colloquial word; the modern use in the sense of "do just enough to meet" (requirements, etc.) is by c. 1956 and might be an independent formation. Related: Satisficing.

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