Etymology
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hygro- 
word-forming element meaning "wet, moist; moisture," from Greek hygros "wet, moist, fluid; weak, soft, flexible." Beekes says possible cognates include Old Norse vokr (accusative vokvan) "moist, wet;" Latin uvidus, udus.
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jalopy (n.)
"battered old automobile," 1924 (early variants include jaloupy, jaloppi, gillopy), of unknown origin; perhaps from Jalapa, Mexico, where many U.S. used cars supposedly were sent (see jalapeno).
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Apollonian (adj.)
1660s, "of, pertaining to, or resembling the Greek god Apollo," from Apollo (Greek Apollon) + -ian. The Greek adjective was Apollonios. Other adjectival forms in English include Apollinarian, Apollonic, Apolline (c. 1600). Also sometimes in reference to Apollonius of Perga, the great geometer.
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ironmonger (n.)
also iron-monger, "dealer in iron-ware," mid-14c. (mid-12c. as a surname), from iron (n.) + monger (n.). Early forms also include ismongere, irenmanger, iremonger. A street named Ysmongeres lane is attested in London from c. 1215. Related: Ironmongery.
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amendment (n.)
early 13c., "betterment, improvement;" c. 1300, of persons, "correction, reformation," from Old French amendement "rectification, correction; advancement, improvement," from amender (see amend). Sense expanded to include "correction of error in a legal process" (c. 1600) and "alteration of a writ or bill" to remove its faults (1690s).
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Nantucket 

island off Massachusetts, early forms include Natocke, Nantican, Nautican; from an obscure southern New England Algonquian word, perhaps meaning "in the middle of waters." Its identity as a summer resort for the wealthy dates to 1950s. Related: Nantucketer.

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conflictual (adj.)

"of or pertaining to conflict," 1950, in psychological writing, from conflict (n.) on model of habitual, etc. Other earlier adjective in more or less the same sense include conflictant (1620s), conflictful (1942), conflictive (1827), conflictory (1817).

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assemblage (n.)
1704, "a collection of individuals," from French assemblage "gathering, assemblage," from assembler (see assemble). Earlier English words in the same sense include assemblement, assemblance (both late 15c.). Meaning "act of coming together" is from 1730; that of "act of fitting parts together" is from 1727.
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waiver (n.)
"act of waiving," 1620s (modern usage is often short for waiver clause); from Anglo-French legal usage of infinitive as a noun (see waive). Baseball waivers is recorded from 1907. Other survivals of noun use of infinitives in Anglo-French legalese include disclaimer, merger, rejoinder, misnomer, ouster, retainer, attainder.
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antisocial (adj.)

also anti-social, "unsocial, averse to social intercourse," 1797, from anti- + social (adj.). Meaning "hostile to social order or norms" is from 1802. Other, older words in the "disinclined to or unsuited for society" sense include dissocial (1762), dissociable (c. 1600).

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