Etymology
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in-gather (v.)
also ingather, 1570s, from in (adv.) + gather (v.). Related: Ingathered; ingathering (1530s).
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lead-in (n.)
1913, in electrical wiring, from verbal phrase; see lead (v.1) + in (adv.). General sense of "introduction, opening" is from 1928, originally in music.
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run-in (n.)

"quarrel, confrontation," 1905, from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + in (adv.). From 1857 as "an act of running in," along with the verbal phrase run in "pay a short, passing visit." Earlier to run in meant "to rush in" in attacking (1815).

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lived-in (adj.)
"inhabited, occupied" (sometimes with suggestion of "shabby, disorderly"), 1873, from verbal phrase; see live (v.) + in (adv.).
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stand-in (n.)
"one who substitutes for another," 1928, from the verbal phrase, attested from 1904 in show business slang in the sense "to substitute, to fill the place of another," from stand (v.) + in (adv.).
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in-between (n.)
1815, "an interval;" also "a person who intervenes," noun use of prepositional phrase, from in (adv.) + between. Related: In-betweener (1912); in-betweenity (1927).
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walk-in (adj.)
1928, "without appointment," from the verbal phrase, from walk (v.) + in (adv.). As a noun, meaning "walk-in closet," by 1946.
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live-in (adj.)
"residing on the premises," 1950, from live (v.) + in (adv.). To live out was formerly "be away from home in domestic service."
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fill-in (n.)
"substitute," 1918 (as an adjective, 1916), from verbal phrase; see fill (v.), in (adv.). Earlier as a noun was fill-up (1811).
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buy-in (n.)
"act of obtaining an interest in," 1970, from verbal phrase buy in "to purchase a commission or stock" (1826), from buy (v.) + in (adv.). To buy into "obtain an interest in by purchase" (as of stock shares) is recorded from 1680s.
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