Etymology
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shut-in (n.)
"person confined from normal social intercourse," 1904, from the verbal phrase, from shut (v.) + in (adv.).
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in-country (n.)
"interior regions" of a land, 1560s, from in (prep.) + country.
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be-in (n.)
"a public gathering of hippies" [OED], 1967, from be + in (adv.).
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in-migration (n.)
1942, American English, in reference to movement within the same country (as distinguished from immigration), from in (prep.) + migration.
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in-service (adj.)
also inservice, 1928, from in (prep.) + service (n.).
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in-gather (v.)
also ingather, 1570s, from in (adv.) + gather (v.). Related: Ingathered; ingathering (1530s).
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lead-in (n.)
1913, in electrical wiring, from verbal phrase; see lead (v.1) + in (adv.). General sense of "introduction, opening" is from 1928, originally in music.
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run-in (n.)

"quarrel, confrontation," 1905, from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + in (adv.). From 1857 as "an act of running in," along with the verbal phrase run in "pay a short, passing visit." Earlier to run in meant "to rush in" in attacking (1815).

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hang in (v.)
"persist through adversity," 1969, usually with there; see hang (v.) + in (adv.).
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lived-in (adj.)
"inhabited, occupied" (sometimes with suggestion of "shabby, disorderly"), 1873, from verbal phrase; see live (v.) + in (adv.).
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