Etymology
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San Francisco 
city in California, U.S., named in Spanish for St. Francis of Assisi; the name first recorded in reference to this region 1590s, reinforced by long association of the area with the Franciscan order.
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Rubik's Cube (n.)

1980, named for teacher Ernö Rubik (born 1944) who patented it in Hungary in 1975.

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Mao (adj.)

1967 in reference to a simple style of clothing popularized in the West and based on dress in Communist China, from French, from name of Mao Tse-tung (1893-1976), Chinese communist leader.

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Sadie 

fem. proper name, a familiar form of Sarah. Sadie Hawkins Day (1939) is from name of a character in U.S. newspaper cartoon strip "Li'l Abner," by Al Capp (1909-1979); in reference to a day in early November on which women take the lead in romantic matters.

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Bobadil (n.)
"blustering braggart," from the name of a boastful character in Ben Jonson's "Every Man in his Humour" (1598).
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Smokey Bear (n.)
"state policeman," 1974, from truckers' slang, in reference to the wide-brim style of hat worn by state troopers (the hats so called by 1969). Ultimately the reference is to a popular illustrated character of that name, dressed in forest ranger gear (including a hat like those later worn by state troopers). He was introduced in 1944 by the U.S. Forest Service and the Wartime Advertising Council in a campaign to lower the number of forest fires in the West.
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Idaho 
1861 as a place name, originally applied by U.S. Congress to a proposed territorial division centered in what is now eastern Colorado; said at the time to mean "Gem of the Mountains" but probably rather from Kiowa-Apache (Athabaskan) idaahe "enemy," a name applied by them to the Comanches. Modern Idaho was organized 1861 as a county in Washington Territory; in 1863 became a territory in its own right and it was admitted as a state in 1890.
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Iscariot 
surname of Judas, betrayer of Jesus, in New Testament, from Latin Iscariota, from Greek Iskariotes, said to be from Hebrew ishq'riyoth "man of Kerioth" (a place in Palestine). In English from 1640s as a noun meaning "traitor." Related: Iscariotical.
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Lassa 
1970 in reference to a febrile disease of tropical Africa, from Lassa, name of a village in northeastern Nigeria.
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Battenberg (n.)
type of cake, 1903, from name of a town in Germany, the seat of a family which became known in Britain as Mountbatten.
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