Etymology
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Piedmont 

region in northern Italy, from Old Italian pie di monte "foot of the mountains," from pie "foot" (from Latin pes "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot") + monte "mountain" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Related: Piedmontese.

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plantar (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the sole of the foot," 1706, from Latin plantaris "pertaining to the sole of the foot," from planta "sole of the foot" (from nasalized form of PIE root *plat- "to spread").

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Dunker (n.)

popular name of a German-American Anabaptist sect, 1756, from (Pennsylvania) German Tunker, from tunken, dunken "to dip, soak" (see dunk (v.)). So called because they practice adult baptism by triple immersion. The proper name is Brethren.

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pedicel (n.)
"footstalk of a plant," 1670s, from Modern Latin pedicellus, diminutive of pediculus "footstalk, little foot," diminutive of pedem (nominative pes) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot."
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immerse (v.)
"to plunge into (a fluid)," early 15c. (implied in immersed), from Latin immersus, past participle of immergere "to plunge in, dip into, sink, submerge" (see immersion). Figuratively, of study, work, passion, etc., from 1660s. Related: Immersed; immersing; immersive.
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vamp (n.1)
"upper of a shoe or boot," 1650s, earlier "part of a stocking that covers the foot and ankle" (c. 1200), from Anglo-French *vaumpé, from Old French avantpié "vamp of a shoe," from avant "in front" (see avant) + pié "foot," from Latin pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").
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sesquipedalian (n.)
1610s, "person or thing a foot and a half long," from Latin sesquipedalia "a foot-and-a-half long," from sesqui- "half as much again" (see sesqui-) + stem of pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). As an adjective 1650s. Meaning "sesquipedalian word" (1830) is from Latin sesquipedalia verba "words a foot-and-a-half long," in Horace's "Ars Poetica" (97), nicely illustrating the thing he is criticizing.
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podagra (n.)

"gout in the foot" (hence gout, generally), late 14c., from Latin podagra, from Greek podagra "gout in the feet," from pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot") + agra "a catching, seizure," related to agrein "to take, seize."

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footfall (n.)
c. 1600, "the tread of the foot;" see foot (n.) + fall (n.). Perhaps first in Shakespeare.
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monopode (n.)

"one of a fabulous race of men believed to live in the tropics and have but one leg with a single enormous foot," 1816, from Modern Latin monopodes, from mono- "single" + pod-, stem of Greek pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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