Etymology
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plutomania (n.)

1650s, "mad pursuit of wealth," from Greek ploutos "wealth" (see Pluto) + mania. As a form of insanity, "imaginary possession of wealth," from 1894. Related: Plutomaniac.

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flatland (n.)
1735, from flat (adj.) + land (n.). Edwin Abbott's popular book about an imaginary two-dimensional world was published in 1884.
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sooterkin (n.)
1680s, imaginary rat-like after-birth believed to be gotten by Dutch women by sitting over stoves, 1680s.
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Brobdingnag 
(not *brobdignag), 1727, Swift's name in "Gulliver's Travels" for an imaginary country where everything was on a gigantic scale.
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hyperspace (n.)
1866, in geometry, "imaginary space of more than three dimensions," from hyper- "over, above, beyond" + space (n.). A hybrid; correctly formed it would be superspace.
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dateline (n.)

also date-line, 1880 as an imaginary line down the Pacific Ocean on which the calendar day begins and ends, from date (n.1) + line (n.). Never set by any treaty or international organization, it is an informal construct meant to coincide with a line 180 degrees (12 hours) from Greenwich, but it always has followed a more or less crooked course.

Meaning "line of text that tells the date and place of origin of a newspaper, article, telegram, etc." is by 1888.

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skyhook (n.)
also sky-hook, "imaginary device to hold things up," 1915, originally aviators' jargon, from sky (n.) + hook (n.). Applied from 1935 to actual device for lifting things into the air.
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Shangri-La (n.)

imaginary earthly paradise, by 1938, from Shangri-La, name of Tibetan utopia in James Hilton's novel "Lost Horizon" (1933, film version 1937). In Tibetan, la means "mountain pass."

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straw man (n.)

1590s, "doll or scarecrow made of bound straw," from straw (n.) + man (n.). Figuratively, in debates, by 1896, from man of straw "an easily refuted imaginary opponent in an argument," which is recorded from 1620s.

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materialization (n.)

also materialisation, 1822, "act of investing with or assuming a material form; a change from a spiritual, ideal, or imaginary state to a state of matter," noun of action from materialize. In spiritualism, "the assumption (by a spirit) of a bodily form," by 1875.

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