Etymology
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grudge (n.)
"ill will excited by some special cause," late 15c., from grudge (v.).
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ailing (adj.)
"sick, ill, suffering," 1590s, present-participle adjective from ail (v.).
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maliciously (adv.)

"in a spiteful manner, with enmity or ill-will," late 14c., from malicious + -ly (2).

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caddish (adj.)
"offensively ill-bred; characteristic of a cad," 1868, from cad (n.) + -ish. Related: Caddishly; caddishness.
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timeless (adj.)
"eternal," 1620s, from time (n.) + -less. Earlier it meant "ill-timed" (1550s). Related: Timelessly; timelessness.
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maugre (prep., adv.)

"in spite of, notwithstanding," mid-14c., from Old French maugre, maulgrec "in spite of" (Modern French malgré), elliptical use of the noun maugre "ill-will, spite," from Latin malus "bad, ill, unpleasant" (see mal-) + gratum "a pleasant thing," noun use of neuter of gratus "pleasing, welcome, agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor"). The noun maugre "ill-will" also was in Middle English (c. 1300). For sense, compare in spite of.

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shirty (adj.)
"ill-tempered," 1846, slang, probably from shirt (n.) + -y (2), on notion of being disheveled in anger.
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malformed (adj.)

"ill-formed, having defects of formation," 1801, from mal- + formed, past participle of form (v.).

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misgovern (v.)

"to govern ill, administer unfaithfully," c. 1400, misgovernen, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + govern. Related: Misgoverned; misgoverning.

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miff (n.)

1620s, "feeling of petulant displeasure, fit of ill humor," colloquial, perhaps imitative of an exclamation of disgust (compare German muffen "to sulk").

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