Etymology
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talipes (n.)

"club-foot, deformed foot," from Latin talus "ankle" (see talus (n.1)) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). The notion seems to be "walking on the ankles."

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Piedmont 

region in northern Italy, from Old Italian pie di monte "foot of the mountains," from pie "foot" (from Latin pes "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot") + monte "mountain" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Related: Piedmontese.

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plantar (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the sole of the foot," 1706, from Latin plantaris "pertaining to the sole of the foot," from planta "sole of the foot" (from nasalized form of PIE root *plat- "to spread").

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pedestrian (adj.)

1716, "prosaic, dull" (of writing), from Latin pedester (genitive pedestris) "plain, not versified, prosaic," literally "on foot" (sense contrasted with equester "on horseback"), from pedes "one who goes on foot," from pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." Meaning "going on foot" is attested by 1791 in English (it also was a sense of Latin pedester). Earlier adjective pedestrial (1610s) meant "of or pertaining to the foot."

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pedicel (n.)

"footstalk of a plant," 1670s, from Modern Latin pedicellus, diminutive of pediculus "footstalk, little foot," diminutive of pedem (nominative pes) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot."

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sesquipedalian (n.)

1610s, "person or thing a foot and a half long," from Latin sesquipedalia "a foot-and-a-half long," from sesqui- "half as much again" (see sesqui-) + stem of pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

As an adjective in English from 1650s, in reference to words, containing or measuring a foot and a half. The meaning "sesquipedalian word" (1830) is from Latin sesquipedalia verba "words a foot-and-a-half long," in Horace's "Ars Poetica," nicely illustrating the thing he describes. Related: Sesquipedalianism.

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vamp (n.1)

"upper of a shoe or boot," 1650s, earlier "part of a stocking that covers the foot and ankle" (c. 1200), from Anglo-French *vaumpé, from Old French avantpié "vamp of a shoe," from avant "in front" (see avant) + pié "foot," from Latin pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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footfall (n.)

c. 1600, "the tread of the foot;" see foot (n.) + fall (n.). Perhaps first in Shakespeare.

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podagra (n.)

"gout in the foot" (hence gout, generally), late 14c., from Latin podagra, from Greek podagra "gout in the feet," from pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot") + agra "a catching, seizure," related to agrein "to take, seize."

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humanity (n.)

late 14c., "kindness, graciousness, politeness; consideration for others," from Old French humanité, umanité "human nature; humankind, life on earth; pity," from Latin humanitatem (nominative humanitas) "human nature; the human race, mankind;" also "humane conduct, philanthropy, kindness; good breeding, refinement," from humanus (see human (adj.)). The dense of "human nature, human form, state or quality of being human" is c. 1400; that of "human race, humans collectively" is recorded by mid-15c.

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