Etymology
Advertisement
Zwinglian (adj.)
1532, after Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), Swiss Protestant reformer who revolted from the Roman communion in 1516 but who differed from Luther on theological points relating to the real presence in the Eucharist.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hollyhock (n.)
mid-13c., holihoc, probably from holi "holy" (see holy) + hokke "mallow," from Old English hocc, a word of unknown origin. Another early name for the plant was caulis Sancti Cuthberti "St. Cuthbert's cole." Native to China and southern Europe, the old story is that it was so called because it was brought from the Holy Land.
Related entries & more 
clergyman (n.)

"member of the clergy, a man in holy orders," 1570s, from clergy + man (n.).

Related entries & more 
paten (n.)

"plate for bread at Eucharist," c. 1300, from Old French patene and directly from Medieval Latin patena, from Latin patina "pan; broad, shallow dish," from Greek patane "plate, dish" (from PIE root *pete- "to spread").

Related entries & more 
transubstantiation (n.)

late 14c., "change of one substance to another," from Medieval Latin trans(s)ubstantiationem (nominative trans(s)ubstantio), noun of action from past participle stem of trans(s)ubstantiare "to change from one substance into another," from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + substantiare "to substantiate," from substania "substance" (see substance). Ecclesiastical sense in reference to the Eucharist first recorded 1530s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sanctify (v.)

late 14c., seintefie "to consecrate," from Old French saintefier "sanctify" (12c., Modern French sanctifier), from Late Latin sanctificare "to make holy," from sanctus "holy" (see saint (n.)) + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Form altered in English c. 1400 to conform with Latin. Meaning "to render holy or legitimate by religious sanction" is from c. 1400; transferred sense of "to render worthy of respect" is from c. 1600. Related: Sanctified; sanctifying.

Related entries & more 
hagiology (n.)
"branch of literature consisting of saints' lives and legends," 1807, from hagio- "holy" + -ology. Related: Hagiologist (1805).
Related entries & more 
hallow (n.)
"holy person, saint," Old English haliga, halga, from hallow (v.). Obsolete except in Halloween.
Related entries & more 
concomitance (n.)

"a being together or in connection with another," 1530s, from French concomitance or directly from Medieval Latin concomitantia, from Late Latin concomitantem (see concomitant). In theology, "the coexistence of the blood and body of Christ in the bread of the Eucharist." Related: Concomitancy.

Related entries & more 
Good Friday (n.)
the Friday before Easter, c. 1300, from good (adj.) in Middle English sense of "holy, sacred," especially of holy days or seasons observed by the church; the word also was applied to Christmas and Shrove Tuesday. Good Twelfthe Dai (c. 1500) was Epiphany (the twelfth day after Christmas).
Related entries & more 

Page 3