Etymology
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cathexis (n.)

"concentration or accumulation of mental energy," 1922, from Latinized form of Greek kathexis "holding, retention," from PIE root *segh- "to hold." Used by psychologists to render Freud's (Libido)besetzung.

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pleistodox (adj.)

"holding the opinion of the majority," 1814 (Coleridge), from Greek pleistos "most," from pleiōn "the more part, very man" (see pleio-) + doxa "opinion, praise" (from dokein "to seem," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept").

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tenure (n.)
early 15c., "holding of a tenement," from Anglo-French and Old French tenure "a tenure, estate in land" (13c.), from Old French tenir "to hold," from Vulgar Latin *tenire, from Latin tenere "to hold" (see tenet). The sense of "condition or fact of holding a status, position, or occupation" is first attested 1590s. Meaning "guaranteed tenure of office" (usually at a university or school) is recorded from 1957. Related: Tenured (1961).
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slavery (n.)
1550s, "severe toil, hard work, drudgery;" from slave (v.) + -ery. Meaning "state of servitude" is from 1570s; meaning "keeping or holding of slaves" is from 1728.
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prize (n.2)

"something taken by force," mid-13c., prise "a taking, holding," from Old French prise "a taking, seizing, holding," noun use of fem. past participle of prendre "to take, seize," from Latin prendere, contraction of prehendere "lay hold of, grasp, seize, catch" (from prae- "before," see pre-, + -hendere, from PIE root *ghend- "to seize, take").

Especially of a ship captured legally at sea (1510s). The spelling with -z- is from late 16c.

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four-flusher (n.)
"cheat, dishonest person," 1900, from verb four-flush "to bluff a poker hand, claim a flush (n.) while holding only four cards in the suit" (1896).
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briefcase (n.)
also brief-case, "portable folding case for holding papers," 1908, from brief (n.) in the paper sense + case (n.2). Earlier was brief-bag (1806).
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pertinacious (adj.)

"unyielding, persistent, resolute" (in holding to a purpose, opinion, course of action, etc.), 1620s, from pertinacy "stubbornness" (late 14c.), from Latin pertinacia, from pertinax "very firm, tenacious" (see pertinacity) + -ous. Related: Pertinaciously.

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pliers (n.)

"small pincers with long jaws adapted for holding small articles," 1560s, plural agent noun from ply (v.2). French cognate plieur meant "folder."

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cathected (adj.)

1927, psychoanalysis jargon, "charged with mental energy, emotionally loaded," a back-formation from cathectic (1927), from Latinized form of Greek kathektikos, from kathexis "holding, retention" (see cathexis).

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