Etymology
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shit-head (n.)

also shithead, "objectionable or contemptible person," by 1961, from shit (n.) + head (n.). Piece of shit for "contemptible person" is by 1916; shit-sack or shitsack in this sense is noted by 1769, in reference to the time of Charles II, as an "opprobrious appellation by which the Nonconformists were vulgarly distinguished." Simple shit (n.) for "obnoxious person" is by 1510s.

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head over heels (adv.)
1726, "a curious perversion" [Weekley] of Middle English heels over head (late 14c.) "somersault fashion," hence "recklessly." Head (n.) and heels long have been paired in alliterative phrases in English, and the whole image also was in classical Latin (per caput pedesque ire).
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fiddle-head (n.)

also fiddlehead, "one with a head as hollow as a fiddle," 1854 (fiddleheaded), from fiddle (n.) + head (n.). As a name for young fern fronds, from 1877, from resemblance to a violin's scroll. Earliest use is nautical, "carved ornamental work at the bow of a ship in the form of a scroll or volute" (1799).

There are three kinds of heads,—1st The Figure-head is one on which is placed the figure of a man, woman, or the like, &c.; 2d, The Billet-head, or Scroll-head is one finished with two scrolls or volutes ...; and 3d, the Fiddle-head, which is finished with only one scroll or volute, having the spirals turning inwards to the vessel. [Peter Hedderwick, "Treatise on Marine Architecture," Edinburgh, 1830]
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-head 
word-forming element meaning "state or condition of being," Middle English -hede, from a variant of Old English -had, the source of -hood. The only surviving words with it are maidenhead and godhead.
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-headed 
"having a head" (of a specified kind); see head (n.).
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headroom (n.)
"space above the head," 1851, from head (n.) + room (n.).
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cat-head (n.)

"beam projecting from each side of the bows of a ship to hold the anchor away from the body of the ship," 1620s, from cat (n.) in some obscure sense.

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headband (n.)
also Related: head-band, 1530s, from head (n.) + band (n.1).
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muddle-headed (adj.)

"confused; stupid," 1759; see muddle (v) + head (n.).

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headbanger (n.)
"devotee of heavy metal music," 1984, from head (n.) + agent noun from bang (v.).
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