Etymology
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head-dress (n.)
also headdress, 1703, from head (n.) + dress (n.) in the older, more general, sense.
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head-hunter (n.)

also headhunter, 1800, "a savage who raids for the purpose of procuring human heads as trophies or for use in religious ceremonies," from head (n.) + hunter. Extended sense "person who finds and recruits desirable workers employed elsewhere to fill job positions" is suggested or in occasional use from 1918, frequent from 1961. Related: Head-hunting (1817).

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head shop (n.)
emporium for stoner gear, by 1969 (noted in 1966 as the name of a specific shop in New York City selling psychedelic stuff), from head (n.) in the drug sense.
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jolt-head (n.)
"a stupid head," 1530s; later also "a big, clumsy, stupid person." The origin and signification of jolt here is unknown.
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hop-head (n.)
also hophead, "opium addict," 1911, from hop (n.2) + head (n.) in the drug sense.
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beach-head (n.)
also beachhead, 1940, in reference to German military tactics in World War II, from beach (n.) + head (n.), on the model of bridgehead, but the image doesn't quite work.
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letter-head (n.)
also letterhead, "sheet of paper with a printed or engraved logo or address," 1868, short for letterheading (1867); from letter (n.1) + heading (n.) in the printing sense. So called because it was printed at the "head" of the sheet of paper.
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mast-head (n.)

also masthead, 1748, "top of a ship's mast" (the place for the display of flags), hence, from 1838, "top of a newspaper" (where its name, etc. appears; the nameplate itself is commonly the flag), from mast (n.1) + head (n.).

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