Etymology
Advertisement
dinnerless (adj.)

"having no dinner," 1660s, from dinner + -less.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ownerless (adj.)

"having no owner," 1792, from owner + -less.

Related entries & more 
riderless (adj.)

"having no rider," by 1766, from rider + -less.

Related entries & more 
necked (adj.)

"having a neck" (of a specified kind); see neck (n.).

Related entries & more 
disposed (adj.)

late 14c., "inclined, in the mood, having a mind (to do something)," past-participle adjective from dispose. Meaning "having a particular turn of mind or mental tendency" (with well-, ill-, etc.) is from early 15c.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
up-to-date (adv.)
1840, "right to the present time," from phrase up to date, probably originally from bookkeeping. As an adjective from 1865. Meaning "having the latest facts" is recorded from 1889; that of "having current styles and tastes" is from 1891.
Related entries & more 
snaggle-toothed (adj.)

"having crooked, projecting teeth," 1580s) from snag (n.), perhaps a frequentative formation, + toothed "having teeth" (of a certain kind); see tooth (n.). Alternative snaggle-tooth (adj.) is from 1650s; snaggle-tooth (n.) is from 1820.

Related entries & more 
muscled (adj.)
"having muscles (of a particular type)," 1640s, from muscle (n.).
Related entries & more 
-headed 
"having a head" (of a specified kind); see head (n.).
Related entries & more 
well-intentioned (adj.)
1590s, from well (adv.) + intentioned "having intentions" (of a specified kind).
Related entries & more 

Page 3