Etymology
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interview (v.)

in early use also enterview, enterveu, 1540s, "to have a personal meeting," from interview (n.). Meaning "have an interview with" (usually with intent to publish what is said" is from 1869. Related: Interviewed; interviewing.

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Guam 

from Chamorro Guahan, said to mean literally "what we have."

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peccavi (v.)

statement acknowledging or confessing sin; Latin, literally "I have sinned;" first person singular preterite indicative active of peccare "to sin" (see peccadillo). Related: peccavimus "we have sinned;" peccavit "he has sinned."

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acquainted (adj.)

early 13c., "personally known;" past-participle adjective from acquaint (v.). Of skills, situations, etc., from late 15c.

I have been one acquainted with the night.
I have walked out in rain — and back in rain.
I have outwalked the furthest city light.
[Robert Frost, from "Acquainted with the Night"]

Acquaint also was used as an adjective (late 13c.) "acquainted."

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gotcha 

by 1913, colloquial pronunciation of "(I have) got you."

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tarbrush (n.)

"brush with which tar is applied," 1711, from tar (n.1) + brush (n.1). To have a touch of the tarbrush "have a dash of African ancestry visible in the skin tone" (1796) was "a term of contempt from the West Indies" [Century Dictionary].

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rate (v.2)

"estimate the worth or value of, reckon by comparative estimation," mid-15c., raten, from rate (n.). Intransitive sense of "have a certain value, rank, or standing" is from 1809; specifically as "have high value" by 1928. Related: Rated; rating.

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asymmetrical (adj.)

"destitute of symmetry, unsymmetrical," 1680s; see asymmetry + -ical. Other forms that have served as an adjective based on asymmetry are asymmetral (1620s), asymmetrous (1660s), and asymmetric (1839); only the last seems to have any general currency. Related: Asymmetrically.

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lowermost (adj.)

1560s, from lower (adj.) + -most. Lowermore (1660s) seems to have gone obsolete.

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date (v.2)

"have a romantic liaison;" 1903, from date (n.3). Related: Dated; dating.

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