Etymology
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consonance (n.)

late 14c., "pleasing combination of sounds, harmony," from Old French consonance (12c.) "consonance, rhyme" and directly from Latin consonantia "harmony, agreement," from consonantem (nominative consonans) "agreeing in sound," present participle of consonare "to sound together, sound aloud" (see consonant (adj.)).

From early 15c. as "agreement among persons as to facts or opinions." Meaning "accord or agreement of sounds in words or syllables" is from 1580s.

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discord (n.)
Origin and meaning of discord

early 13c., descorde, "unfriendly feeling, ill will;" also "dissension, strife," from Old French descorde (12c.) "disagreement," from Latin discordia, from discors (genitive discordis) "disagreeing, disagreement," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + cor (genitive cordis) "heart," from PIE root *kerd- "heart."

Musical sense "want of harmony between two notes sounded together; a combination of notes not in harmony with one another" is from late 14c.

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Sweet Adeline 
female barbershop singing group member, 1947, from the name of a popular close harmony song by Richard Armstrong & Harry Gerard, "You're the Flower of my Heart, Sweet Adeline" (1903).
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melodic (adj.)

1818, "melodious;" by 1823, "pertaining to the melody" (as distinguished from the harmony), from French mélodique, from Late Latin melodicus, from Greek melodikos, from melodia (see melody). Related: Melodical "melodious" (1590s).

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symphonic (adj.)
1854 "involving similarity of sounds or harmony" (implied in symphonically); see symphony + -ic. Meaning "pertaining to a symphony" is from 1864. Earlier was symphonious (1650s).
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Concorde (n.)

supersonic passenger airliner operating from 1976 to 2003, from French concorde, literally "harmony, agreement" (see concord (n.)), reflecting the Anglo-French collaborative agreement that produced it.

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sync (n.)
also synch, 1929, shortened form of synchronization (see synchronize). Originally in reference to soundtracks and pictures in the movies. Sense of "synchronization, harmony, agreement" first recorded 1961 in in sync. As a verb, short for synchronize, by 1945.
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descant (v.)

mid-15c., discanten, "to run a variety with the voice in harmony with a musical theme, sing in counterpoint," from descant (n.). Sense of "to comment at length, make copious and varied comments" is attested by 1640s.

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Boxer Rebellion (n.)
1900, a name based on a mistranslation of the name of a Chinese xenophobic society, I-He-T'uan, "Righteous Harmony Band," rendered by British as I-He-Ch'uan "Righteous Uniting Fists," and so associated with the pugilistic boxer.
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disaccord (v.)

late 14c., disacorden "be contrary; disagree, refuse assent," from Old French desacorder (12c., Modern French désaccorder), from des- "opposite of" (see dis-) + acorder "agree, be in harmony" (see accord (v.)). Related: Disaccorded; disaccording.

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