Etymology
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hand-basket (n.)

also handbasket, late 15c., from hand (n.) + basket (n.). Expression hell in a handbasket is attested by 1867, in a context implying use from a few years before, and the notion of going to Heaven in a handbasket is from 1853, implying "easy passage" to the destination.

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right hand (n.)

the hand opposed to the left hand, late Old English rihthand; see right (adj.2) + hand (n.). So called as the one normally the stronger of the two. Applied to the right side generally by c. 1200. As a symbol of friendship or alliance, by 1590s. Figurative for "indispensable helper, person of use or importance," 1520s (right-hand man is attested by 1660s). Right-handed "having the right hand more useful than the left" is attested from late 14c.; as an adjective from c. 1700. Right-hander, of persons, "one who uses the right hand more skillfully than the left" is by 1885.

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handstand (n.)
also hand-stand, 1897 as an athletic feat, from hand (n.) + stand (n.).
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handbill (n.)
loose paper circulated by hand to make a public announcement, 1753, from hand (n.) + bill (n.1). Also applied to posted bills.
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hands-on (adj.)
by 1969, originally in reference to the use of computers in education; see hand (n.) + on (adv.).
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handcraft (n.)
Old English handcræft "manual skill, power of the hand; handicraft;" see hand (n.) + craft (n.).
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handbell (n.)
one rung by hand rather than by rope, etc., Old English handbelle; see hand (n.) + bell (n.).
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handbag (n.)
also hand-bag, "bag for small articles, carried in the hand," 1854, from hand (n.) + bag (n.).
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unhand (v.)
c. 1600, "to release from one's grasp," from un- (2) "opposite of" + hand (v.).
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