Etymology
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lodestone (n.)
"magnetically polarized oxide of iron," 1510s, literally "way-stone," from lode (n.) + stone (n.). So called because it was used to make compass magnets to guide mariners. Figurative use from 1570s. Compare lodestar.
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surgical (adj.)

1770, earlier chirurgical (early 15c.), from surgery + -ical. Related: Surgically.

surgical strike: There is no such thing. Don't use unless in a quote, then question what that means. [Isaac Cubillos, "Military Reporters Stylebook and Reference Guide," 2010]
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pilot (v.)

1640s, figurative, "to guide, to lead, direct the course of, especially through an intricate or perilous passage;" 1690s in the literal sense "to conduct (a vessel) as a pilot," from pilot (n.) or from French piloter. Related: Piloted; piloting.

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signpost (n.)
also sign-post, 1610s, "sign on a post, usually indicating an inn or shop," from sign (n.) + post (n.1). Meaning "guide- or direction-post along a road" is attested from 1863. Figurative sense is from 1889.
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exegesis (n.)
1610s, "explanatory note," from Greek exegesis "explanation, interpretation," from exegeisthai "explain, interpret," from ex "out" (see ex-) + hegeisthai "to lead, guide," from PIE root *sag- "to track down, seek out" (see seek (v.)). Meaning "exposition (of Scripture)" is from 1823. Related: Exegetic; exegetical; exegetically.
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dragoman (n.)

"an interpreter, a guide for travelers," c. 1300, drugeman, from Old French drugemen and directly from Medieval Latin dragumanus, from late Greek dragoumanos, from Arabic targuman "interpreter," from targama "interpret." Treated in English as a compound from man (n.), with plural -men.

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rector (n.)

late 14c., rectour (late 13c. as a surname, early 13c. in Anglo-Latin), "ruler of a country or people" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin rector "ruler, governor, director, guide," from rect-, past participle stem of regere "to rule, guide" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule").

The meaning "head of a college or religious community" is by early 15c., though the exact religious sense varies across place and time and with different denominations. Used originally of Roman governors and God; by 18c. generally restricted to clergymen and college heads. Fem. forms were rectress (c. 1600); rectrix (1610s). Related: Rectorship; rectorial.

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keyword (n.)
also key-word, "word which serves as a guide to other words or matters," 1807, from key (n.1) in the figurative sense + word (n.). Originally in reference to codes and ciphers. In reference to information retrieval systems, "word from the text chosen as indicating the contents of a document" (1967).
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bridle (v.)
"to control, dominate; restrain, guide, govern," c. 1200, a figurative use of Old English bridlian "to fit with a bridle," from bridel (see bridle (n.)). Meaning "to throw up the head" (as a horse does when reined in) is from mid-15c. Related: Bridled; bridling.
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internet (n.)
1984, "the linked computer networks of the U.S. Defense Department," shortened from internetwork, inter-network, which was used from 1972 in reference to (then-hypothetical) networks involving many separate computers. From inter- "between" + network (n.). Associated Press style guide decapitalized it from 2016.
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